Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria’s Secret Show Countdown

Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria's Secret Show Countdown London Hand EmbroideryThe run up to a show is always super exciting, but Victoria’s Secret pulled out all the stops in London before their New York show with a countdown event.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria's Secret Show Countdown London Hand Embroidery

Offering a personalisation service on their items, whilst the store screen showed videos of past shows and a timer for the big event.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria's Secret Show Countdown London Hand Embroidery

They had six machines all working away on the service, adding the initals of the customers onto their items.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria's Secret Show Countdown London Hand Embroidery

The items we were working on ranged from across the store, including bras, panties, hoodies, robes and much more!

Hawthorne & Heaney for Victoria's Secret Show Countdown London Hand EmbroideryIf you missed us here, don’t worry, we have lots of other customisation events going on all over the place that you can have your personalisation done by us at failing that, come by to the studio to get your gifts personalised this Christmas.

View this post on Instagram

Onsite at @victoriassecretuk 💕

A post shared by Embroidery Events & Services (@hawthorneheaneyhere) on

 

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders

Looking through our website, you would be right in thinking that a fair amount of our work revolves around one off gifts, unique pieces and protypes; however we are able to produce quantity orders, should that be what you and your brand requires.

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Hand Embroidered Monograms onto Hankerchiefs

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Raised Machine Embroidery onto Napkins

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Freestanding Branded Patches

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand EmbroideryPersonalised Towels

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand EmbroideryHot Water Bottle and Blanket Sets

 We can offer express turn arounds subject to availability also as our studio is conveniently located in Central London. Get in touch if you have a project in mind that we can help with.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

Last month, The Worshipful Company of Broderers held a fashion show, dedicated to the best of embroidery in British Fashion. Hawthorne & Heaney was invited to be involved and naturally, it was an opportunity that could not be missed.

 

The Worshipful Company of Broderers is a livery company, dedicated to the protection and promotion of the art of embroidery. Also known as ‘The Brotherhood of The Holy Ghost of the City of London’, it was originally formed in the middle ages, receiving a Grant of Arms in 1558 and its first Charter on 25th October 1561 from Queen Elizabeth I. Charitable works lie at the core of the company as it functions today, with the fashion show acting as a fundraising event for their charity; Fine Cell Work and the Broderers’ Charity Trust. Fine Cell Work teaches needle-work to prison inmates and sells their products.  Established in 1997, Fine Cell Work now operates in more than 15 prisons to empower and rehabilitate inmates in preparation for their sucessful return to society.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

On what was a very balmy September evening, the company gathered beautiful examples of british embroidery work from well known designers such as Bruce Oldfield, Clements Ribeiro, Jasper Conran and Beulah, one example of which can be seen above. The show was held in the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral, London with the ladieswear mostly demonstrated beadwork with an array of evening gowns on show (as seen above).

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand EmbroideryHawthorne & Heaney was invited to contribute to the show in the form of these goldwork waistcoats for the gentlemen to wear. These were later auctioned off to raise further funds for the cause. Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

The first features a circular dove motif on purple with silkworks for the center and a cutwork edge.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

The second piece was this striking pair of rampant lions on red.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand EmbroideryThe lions are most embroidered over raisings with cutwork, a pearle purl edges and silver/red accents throughout.Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

For more information on any The Worshipful Company of Broderers or Fine Cell Work, follow the links in the text above.

Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts

Welcoming a new child is an import right of passage for many cultures which often involves the giving a receiving of gifts. We often get to work on some of these gifted pieces to add that personalised touch to them for a whole host of different occasions:

The multi coloured one:Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand EmbroideryThis baby blanket came with the special request of having the colours in a series of shades of blue, so here is the finished effect in this script font.

The little addition one:Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery

This bib already had the pram design embroidered onto it, so we matched the colour of the monogram to the existing embroidery for that personal touch.

The Sleeping Sack One:

Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery

This sleeping sack had another small embroidery in the same position which the customer didn’t like, so we removed the existing embroidery and replaced it with this design instead.

The Baby Bib:Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand EmbroiderySometimes, the new baby is just too exciting for you to wait for the official name to have been announced, so hedge your bets with a piece like this one.

The Message One:Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery

If the whole name or a date isn’t your style, then what about a personal message like this one which went onto a blanket.

The Commemorative One:

Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery Hawthorne & Heaney does Baby Naming Day Gifts London Hand Embroidery

We added the names of the babies which have been christened in them to these gowns along with their christening date, and plenty of room to add the children that will no doubt use these gowns in the future too.

 

If you have something in mind for the new arrival in your life, get in touch and we can talk through what we can do you for.

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms

Hawthorne and Heaney are very fortunate have a a great variety of work that comes through our door which means that you may have unknowing seen our work. 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms London Hand Embroidery

Earlier this year, we worked on a piece for the advertising campaign for ‘Kalms’. They wanted to create an embroidery of their slogan onto the duvet with the real life packet.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms London Hand Embroidery

The colour of the stitching was very important that it would photograph true against the colours of the packaging so we spent some time testing a few threads before settling on this one as the strongest option. The texture of the stitching was also very important to them as they wanted it to have a very hand embroidered feel, but the stitching is done by machine. Therefore we chose a cotton thread which is also used for hand embroidering and paid special attention to the direction of the stitched to make them look like they flow naturally, like ink from a pen.

 

We were very please with the end result, and feel that we achieved what we were trying to achieve with this project.  Have you seen it about?

Hawthorne & Heaney: Internship Opportunity Available

Hawthorne & Heaney: Internship Opportunity Available London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney is currently looking for an embroidery intern to join us for an immediate start.

We are looking for a current undergraduate fashion/textiles/costume student to join us in the studio for a 3 month internship. Duties will include machine and hand sewing, general administration, maintenance of the social media sites, research, assisting with embroidery preparation for both the staff and for the School and errands. Time is also set aside from duties to develop your own embroidery skills during your internship. Applicants must be hard working, versatile, enthusiastic, professional, responsible and able work well in a small team. Attention to detail is a must along with patience as nothing in embroidery is particularly quick.

Specific Needs

  • Sewing skills are essential, and a proficiency in both hand and machine sewing would be ideal.
  • Computer knowledge of both MAC and PC, ideally with an understanding of adobe programs and G drive
  • Trend aware
  • Looking to gain experience in a live studio in the embroidery sector
  • Must be a current undergraduate student of a fashion/textiles related course
  • Able to travel into London every day

This internship is unpaid and should be taken in addition to a current undergraduate course, we are therefore unable to accept non students for this position. Hours are full time, Monday- friday 9-5pm.

If you would be interested in furthering your studies please fill out the attached form.

Hawthorne & Heaney: Internship Opportunity Available London Hand EmbroideryElsie Wong (Former Intern) with her sample work

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall


Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

This summer, we were lucky enough to be approach by the artist and interior designer; Luke Edward Hall in preparation for the opening of his summer shop in Belgravia.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

Illustration by Luke Edward Hall

He wanted to have two chairs embroidered with one of his designs, so we took his illustration (above) and created it as an embroidery which he then had made into these two gorgeous pieces. 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

Stitched out on the green canvas, I think you will agree the chairs reflect the illustration very well and fit in with his ‘Greco-Disco’ style. The fabric was then made up by HOWE at 36 Bourne Street to  result in the finished pieces. We just love it when a collaborative effort come out this strongly.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

 

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up – Exhibition Visit

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo in blue satin blouse, 1939, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

The exhibition Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is currently at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and we recently took the chance to visit. This unique show gives a detailed overview of Kahlo’s life: her family and heritage; her politics; her relationship with mural painter Diego Rivera; the near-fatal accident that caused her a lifetime of pain; and most importantly, how she constructed her image and the way in which she lived her life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Kahlo’s home in Mexico, La Casa Azul (The Blue House).

Upon Kahlo’s death in 1954, her husband Rivera locked up her most valuable possessions in the bathroom of the Casa Azul (The Blue House, their home in Mexico) and instructed that it not be opened until 15 years after her death. In 2004 this bathroom was opened, and the contents of the room went on display at the Casa Azul as a museum dedicated to her life. These objects are what now fill the exhibition space at the V&A, carefully shipped thousands of miles to be shown outside of Mexico for the first time.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo and Family, 1926, photograph by Guillermo Kahlo.
Kahlo challenges gender stereotypes by wearing a suit.

The exhibition begins with old photographs of Kahlo and her family, some of which are adorned with Kahlo’s handwritten notes. Some simply label family members, whereas others are more personal: for example, on the back of Kahlo’s Communion photo she has scrawled “¡IDIOTA!” as she renounced Catholicism later in life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Pre-columbian jade beads, possibly assembled by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

The show continues through a series of rooms to Kahlo’s accessories: heavy jade necklaces; crescent earrings featuring paired birds, which are traditional of Mexican jewellery; and hand-woven ‘Rebozo’ shawls and ‘Morrale’ sack bags. These items highlight Kahlo’s pride in her Mexican heritage.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Revlon nail varnishes, compact and lipstick in Kahlo’s favourite shade, ‘Everything’s Rosy’.

We then move on to Kahlo’s possessions, perhaps one of the most personal parts of the exhibition. Intimate items are on display such as used lipsticks and empty medicine bottles accompanied by letters to and from her various doctors.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Plaster corset, painted and decorated by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

Kahlo’s suffering due to childhood polio and a car accident at the age of 18 lies at the foundation of some of these objects. For most of her life she wore uncomfortable corsets to help support her back and alleviate pain, some of which were made of plaster and decorated with painting as Kahlo used them like a canvas.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Left: Cotton Huipil with chain stitch embroidery, cotton skirt with printed floral motifs.
Right: Guatemalan cotton coat worn with Mazatec Huipil and plain floor-length skirt.

Finally, the main feature of the exhibition is a stunning display case of Kahlo’s clothing. Kahlo is renowned for her combinations of indigenous garments from different regions of Mexico, and she was photographed in such outfits many times. To see them up close in real life is breathtaking.

Detailed embroidery is present in most of the outfits, from complexly shaded flowers and birds to cross stitch to traditional Chinese embroidery (due to Kahlo’s fascination with Chinatown when she moved to the USA with Rivera). The exhibition gives details of her most striking outfits, describing how she was followed by children when in the USA, who asked “Where is the circus?”.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Self Portrait with Monkeys, 1943. Oil on Canvas, 81.5 x 63cm.

There are some of Kahlo’s paintings – mainly self portraits as she used herself as a subject when painting from her bed – but the exhibition mainly focuses on Kahlo’s items and how she presented the complex layers of her identity within her life. It states that her wardrobe was not staged: she dressed up even when she wasn’t expecting visitors, and even when she was in bed rest.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo on the Bench, 1939. © Nickolas Murray Photo Archives.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is a bewitching and intimate exhibition. The items on display are fascinating, and through them the personal details of how Kahlo naturally lived an artistic life – despite her misfortunes and pain – are revealed. A must-see for anyone interested in textiles, and anyone interested in Frida Kahlo’s complex and inspiring life.

Purchase tickets at the V&A website here.

Written by Laura Hill

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney has been very fortunate to have a series of wonderful students who come to the studio as interns to learn about the industry and experience a working studio. But what do they actually do while they are with us I hear you ask?

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

 

What they work on day to day is very changeable but for our longer term interns we like them to have a project of their own ongoing whilst they are with us. The gorgeous images you see here are from our most recent intern, Elsie Wong who was working on some floral motifs for us along side her other duties.

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

She draws on her Singaporean heritage and Central Saint Martins experience to bring her clean yet delicate style to these pieces. 

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

She then went on to translate one of the pieces into embroidery using one of the techniques learnt in her classes at the London Embroidery School, specifically Limerick Lace. 

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

Here is is presenting her final piece to us demonstrating the design process from design, to draft, to embroidery.  I’m sure you will agree, great job Elsie! What do you think?

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand EmbroideryIf this has taken your fancy and you would like to join us as an intern, please see the internships blog or jobs section of the website for application as we are currently looking for someone to join us for an immediate start.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs

Embroidery repairs is a topic we keep coming back to but we thought we would share another project with you where embroidery was used to breath new life into a damaged garment.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand EmbroideryIt is so pleasing when we are able to use a method that is usually about decoration only but also allow an item that would have otherwise have lost its use, to be beautiful and useful again.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand Embroidery

Damaged area before embroidery

This jacket was made of a very rough grain tweed which through rubbing and wear had got damaged and started to ray over a large area of about 15 cm. The embroidery that was designed for the area was inspired by the Japanese practise of Kintsukuroi (golden repair) where broken pottery is fixed using gold laquer.  It ties in with the philosophy of wabi-sabi, embracing of the flawed or imperfect which felt appropriate for this project given that we knew that the damage would still be to come extent visible but making the repair in an asthetically pleasing way makes the object becomes more beautiful for having been broken and fixed.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand Embroidery

We used 4 shades of blue to reflect the different thread colours in the weave which are all in satin stitch to help to hold the damaged area together. Then there is a layer of gold metallic thread added over raisings to give it that laquered effect that is so significant to this technique and ties in with the metal details of the jacket. After the embroidery there were still a few threads to pulled through to tidy as can be seen and to reattach the hem, but we were very please with the end result.