Hawthorne & Heaney Explores The Life of Francis Golding

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Francis Golding – 1944 – 2013

The Francis Golding Exhibition: ‘a sartorial biography’ at The Museum of London is a small viewing celebrating the fashion and life of Francis Golding. He became a fashion icon and ‘charts the changes in the city’s style over the last 40 years’. He was born 1944 and sadly passed away a few years ago in a tragic bike crash.

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Career

Frances Golding moved to London in 1967 when he was 23, the city at this time was a fast growing, vibrant city with great social culture through a boom in music, theatre and fashion. Golding started his London career shaping the city landscape with his architecture soon becoming a successful career. He became one of London’s leading architectural, planning and conservation consultants with projects including the Gherkin, the Walkie-Talkie and One New Change.

Fashion

Golding was passionate about fashion and collecting menswear. The exhibition explores 14 items that belonged to Golding through his London life.

At this time expressing yourself through fashion was key, allowing your identity to be shown through society. The homosexuality act was discriminated among men and the expression through fashion enable people to show what could not be said out loud, through their clothes.

The Museum of London described Golding to “portray a ‘dandy’ look for that day and age in London”- ‘…soon I will look like the bi sexual libertine I am’.

The following Photos are examples Golding’s Fashion and accessories on show at The Museum of London exhibition

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Window display at the Museum of London exhibition of Francis Golding’s clothing and accessories 1960-75.

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Close up view: Black leather Briefcase, known to be used at the beginning of Golding’s civil service career.

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Close up view: Black leather boots, Foster and Son, London.

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Close up view: Printed tie, from Thea Porter  (red) and Liberty of London tie (green patterns).

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Striped jumper from Bloomingdales 1960.

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Window display in The Museum of London exhibition. A latter selection of Golding’s Fashion. The difference in materials and colours is quite prominent, perhaps him settling into the London living and influences of the city in the 21st century.

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Close up view: the label on Timothy Everest tie. Beautiful details and quality in the materials.

Architecture

Francis Golding was one of the country’s leading architectural, planning and conservation consultants, and had a big influence on the look of contemporary London. He had many collaborations, for example: Norman Foster, Richard Rogers, Terry Farrell, Rick Mather, Rafael Viñoli, Jean Nouvel and Michael Hopkins.

His collaboration with Norman Foster was particularly memorable as it was for the Gherkin, London.

By Phillipa Lloyd

Hawthorne & Heaney for Diana: Designing a Princess BBC Documentary

2017 sees the 20th anniversary of the tragic death of our beloved Diana, Princess of Wales. To mark the anniversary, BBC Two has made a documentary called ‘Diana: Designing a Princess’ to celebrate the Princesses sense of style and fashion. Hawthorne and Heaney are excited and grateful to say we played a small part in this by embroidering section titles for the documentary.

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As one of the most famous women on the planet, this programme traces the evolution of the Princess’s style, ‘from the demure, romantic outfits of her first public appearances’.

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To her playing the role of a ‘fairy tale princess’

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She captured the hearts of the world and elevated to the ‘glamour, elegance and confidence of her later life’.

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Princess Diana Dancing with John Travolta on her visit to America at President Reagan’s White House Gala in 1985.

The BBC2 documentary is presented by Brenda Emmanus, BBC’s Art, Culture and Entertainment correspondent and was produced in collaboration with the Historic Royal Places. Brenda looks at some of Diana’s ‘most celebrated and exquisite dresses’, which have been brought together for a new exhibition at Kensington Palace – open from 24th February 2017 and runs until March 2018.

Brenda then visits the Conservation Studio at Hampton Court Palace as the dresses are prepared for display.

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She hears from historians, cultural commentators and the designers who dressed Diana, including Elizabeth Emanuel, Victor Edelstein and David Sassoon. Exhibition curator Eleri Lynn says that Diana, was ‘an excellent silent communicator through her clothes’ and this can be noted in the so called ‘Revenge Dress’ she unveiled on the night Prince Charles admitted adultery.

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Diana broke away from the traditional image of royal outfits and created her own image as a modern princess.

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This year, the Princess would have turned 56, which seems unimaginable and this exhibition and documentary is a perfect way to understand Diana’s fashion choices and to celebrate Diana.

The documentary is still available to watch on BBC TWO.

 

References:

Historical Royal Places – http://www.hrp.org.uk/kensington-palace/visit-us/top-things-to-see-and-do/diana-her-fashion-story/#gs.TxGK4KA

History of Royal Women – http://www.historyofroyalwomen.com/diana-princess-of-wales/diana-princess-waless-fashion-legacy-celebrated-kensington-palace/

The Telegraph – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tv/2017/02/25/diana-designing-princess-provokes-mixed-emotions-review/

Marie Claire – http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/fashion/princess-diana-s-dresses-the-truth-behind-her-most-famous-fashion-moments-116675

Vanity Fair – http://www.vanityfair.com/style/2016/09/john-travolta-princess-diana-dance-memory

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kent and Curwen A/W 2017

It’s exciting to announce that Hawthorne & Heaney have worked with Kent and Curwen to produce beautiful embroidered badges for their new collection.

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Kent & Curwen, was first established in 1926, ‘two years after Eric Kent and Dorothy Curwen first crossed paths on Savile Row’. The company was described as a sports related gentlemen’s fashion brand that first began as a manufacturer of military, club, and college repp ties. In 1972, K&C had a defining moment when they produced kits for both England and Australia in the Ashes. The relationship with The England team lasted for well over ’20 years, supplying knits and caps well into the Nineties’.

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As of recent, David Beckham has joined Kent and Curwen in a partnership, acting as a brand ambassador and to us he is the perfect fit – ‘a true gentleman, celebrated for his fashion style and the British sports hero of his generation’.

Working with creative director Daniel Kearns, they have both created a collection ‘of everything a man would want to wear right now’. From ‘sun-faded rugby shirts, classic outerwear to English heritage knits.’ Most of these products bears a badge that reflects the heritage of Kent & Curwen – the Three Lions and the English Rose. These embroidered badges are both long held symbols of the brand and we at Hawthorne & Heaney are delighted at the way they turned out!

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Kent & Curwen launched this collection as part of London Fashion Week Mens and in an interview with WWD, Kearns expressed that this collection aims to appeal to a new British generation. The collection is now on selling on the Kent & Curwen’s website and Mr Porter so check it out to get your hands on it.

Kent and Curwen are seriously embarking on a new chapter in their rich history and we are so excited to be part of that.

Find out a bit more about the K&C here:

References:

WGSN – https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/david-beckham-to-help-design-kent-curwens-autumnwinter-2016-collection/#

Kent and Curwen official website – https://www.kentandcurwen.com/heritage/

GQ – http://www.gq.com/story/david-beckhams-kent-curwen-new-menswear-line

By Hasina

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Joshua Kane A/W 2017

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On Friday night, Hawthorne & Heaney were a few of the audience members to watch the the fashion show of Joshua Kane’s A/W 2017 collection. Held at the London Palladium, it was a grand affair with 2250 people eagerly watching as Kane wanted to be able to share the experience with his fans as well as the high fashion crowd. Therefore, tickets were available for anyone to buy, attend and enjoy.

Entitled, ‘Journey’ the brand did not disappoint with an amazing set of intricate lattice work depicting a early 20th century tube station, newly built and creating a social microcosm of it’s own as the classes mingle. On this we were introduced to the narative with a couple of models interacting briefly before the main body of the show got started.

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The shows itself was crisp, sharp and well polished as is only fitting for a Joshua Kane collection. Not only was this show unusual to be shared with the wider audience in this way, but was also Kane’s first show that was an equal split of mens and womenswear. The line up finished with the three looks which Hawthorne & Heaney produced embroidered pieces for, in the form of a horse head, with chess board, military and heraldic influences.

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Great to see some of my embroidery on the runway this evening @hawthorneheaney #joshuakanejourney #embroidery #lfw

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The show finished with a moving performance by the two models/dancers that we were introduced to at the start.

A beautiful presentation of tailoring from last nights fashion show #joshuakanejourney #ballet #suits

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As always it was lovely to be involved in an exciting project like this, particulally with such as beautiful outcome and was wonderful to see them on their debut in person. If you would like to seemore of the collection follow the link here. We are looking forward to what they produce for next season already!

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Experiments with Machine Ceremonial Military Embroidery

For quite some time now, we have been playing around with the idea of developing a machine embroidery that would communicate some similar ideas to traditional military style goldwork but in a crisper, more modern way. In true Hawthorne & Heaney style, we didnt just want to go in for a little sample that we could get to work on a small scale, but a big piece that would really hit you in the face, so we settled on a version of the Privy Councillors Coatie.IMG_0804

We wanted the piece to not only have a rich gold look of the original piece , but also the different heights to the stitching and surface details that come with applying bullion individually.

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The colours are worked in layers, adding layers of padding between colours to create light relief.

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Following these processes, the machine then goes back into to add additional details :

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Once all of that is done, we give it a little tidy up and it is complete. To give you a sense of scale this piece is 45 cm high which would be the left hand side of a mens jacket. It is really exciting for us to see a large scale outcome for this technique which has defiantely sparked some subsequent ideas, so stay tuned to see what we do next…

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Hawthorne and Heaney Visits Burberry Maker’s House

Burberry is one of the most acclaimed British fashion houses, and to celebrate their Spring/Summer 2017 collection, Burberry partnered up with The New Craftsmen to hold a week long exhibition at Maker’s House, Soho. This event showcased the best of British craftsmen, designers and makers as well as the latest Burberry collection.

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As you make your way into the house, you walk through the garden which is covered in fairy lights with large white sculptures of heads, figures and giant horses creating a magical atmosphere before you’ve entered the building.

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The house was divided into sections, the first floor is where the makers set up their studio for the day. Each day there are a new group of makers, from jewelry makers, basket makers and textile designers. Whilst I was there, I was lucky enough to see the work of Shepherds Book Binders, sculptor Thomas Merrett, textile designers Rosalind Wyatt and Rose De Borman and even got to listen to storytelling from Pindrop studios. Watching all of this was very exciting, especially to see the work that goes into their practice.

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Downstairs is where they displayed giant mood boards showing the inspiration behind Burberry’s SS17 collection designed by Christopher Bailey. For this collection, Bailey took inspiration from the novel ‘Orlando’ by Virginia Woolf, where in the novel the protagonist’s gender changes halfway through. He also drew influences from Nancy Lancaster’s interior design, using her sense of colour and floral designs.

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At the very top of the Makers House is where the Burberry collection was located. Each look was presented across the room with music playing in the background. There was a huge screen where we could watch the catwalk show and this was held here in the Makers House. We found out that even the carpet was bespoke designed for the show!

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The colours in the collection ranged from black and gold to soft mint greens and pinks. Shapes and techniques used alongside the colours captured both feminine and masculine qualities and this fits the story of Orlando.

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This collection was also celebrated as this was the first time the garments were available to buy immediately after the show. Normally it takes around six months to buy what you see on the catwalk.

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This was truly a beautiful collection and a great way for everyone to experience and celebrate London Fashion Week.

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for A V Robertson

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If you follow our Instagram, then  you may have seen our post earlier in the week about the Fashion East show which we were delighted to have played a part in.  The mancunian designer, A V Robertson who specialises in embellished womenswear created a collection of elegant looks with an abundance of 3D leaves and hand embroidered elements. We were responsible for creating the leaves and petals that grow out of the garments, each of which was individually hand made.

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The process started with making hundreds of meters bias binding which would seal and finish each of the pieces. As you can see Amie from A V Robertson had chosen a very exciting colour palette to work with, so there were many combinations to choose from.

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After pressing all the binding into shape, it was then applied to the center fabric that made up the body of the leaves.

img_0483With 8 colours of binding, 13 fabric insides and 8 leaf shapes, there were hundreds of potential combinations.

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Then it was over to Amie to put her creations all together, if you would like to see the whole collection, click here for the vogue website.

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Hawthorne & Heaney at Debenhams Christmas in July Event

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It may only be August, but Hawthorne & Heaney have already done our first monogramming event for Christmas 2016. The Debenhams PR team, in conjunction with Reverb held their Christmas in July event in a beautiful house in Fitzrovia where we were providing our machine monogramming services.

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The launched their Christmas ranges which included fashion, homewear, lingerie and more. Our embroiderer Pearl and her assistant Chelsea were adding initials to pyjamas and hankerchieves for the attendies while they explored the rest of the event.

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Debenhams guest designers such as Patrick Grant and Julian McDonald were there to talk to the attendies about their collections. The team chose two of our classic fonts in a range of 5 colours for people to personalise their pieces with.

debs 5All in all it was a very busy day, with plenty of glitz and glamour that has set the bar for the rest for the events to come later in the year.

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Hawthorne & Heaney at the V&A’s Undressed Exhibition

The Victoria and Albert Museum has such a great reputation for its fashion exhibitions and their new underwear epic ‘Undressed’ does not disappoint.  The exhibition is in the fashion section of the museum and is split between the historical pieces below and contemporary pieces on the first floor.

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For me the historical pieces are always the most intriguing as you start at the 18th Century corsets and work you way through. A great example of this is this baby blue corset made of cotton twill and silk lined. It is reinforced with whale bone and metal busk with machine lace and hand embroidery details. The embroidery on this piece is quite simple with the long fanned stitches around the hips and bust but it is very effective all the same. Most of the corsets are over 200 years old so it is amazing that they have survived to be displayed.

T.368-1976 Brassiere Brassiere, satin, ca. 1929, English England Ca. 1929 Satin and machine made ecru

Moving forward there are some lovely lace examples from the 20’s and 30’s such as the above brassiere and negligee below. They demonstrate the development of the technology in this area and to see the intricacy that they were able to achieve.

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Along side the more prim and proper pieces are those which have a sense of humour such as the knickers pictured below. They belonged to a society Lady from the 1930’s who moved to the far east and commissioned these knickers as a fun item to have. They turned out to be to be quite useful, as the story goes, when she needed an ice breaker with other ladies she met, she would lift up her skirts and flash them a look at her hunting themed knickers to their great amusement. The hunting theme is achieved by lace applique of machine lace onto silk chiffon.

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v and a underwear gartersThe exhibition also offers a selection of garters, stocking and other underwear additions as well. There are some great examples of embroidery on these as there are greater opportunities to be create with them.

 

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Moving upstairs, the focus is more on how underwear has progressed and its other interpreations such as into outwear.  The piece below is reminisant of 17th Century fashion but is a piece from the Galliano show for Givenchy haute couture 1996 where underwear becomes outerwear. The embroidery on this piece is quite stunning with the romantic colouring of the stitching onto sheer muslin.

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There is also a short video with interviews and insight into the design process with designers such as Fifi Chachnil and La Perla if you need a little sit down after all the lingerie.

Undressed: A Brief History of Underwear is at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London SW7, until 12 March 2017. vam.ac.uk. Click here for another review from respected Dress historian Lucy Worsley for the Guardian.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Young Designers

At this time of year we are lucky enough to get a sneak peak at some of the freshest fashion talent around as Students from all over contact us with their ideas for their final collections. This insight into the future of fashion is always so exciting to see and often pushes us beyond our usual style or way of approaching a project. This year we have been working with designers such as Mary Ashcroft, Naomi Bartling and Palmina Cerullo.

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Mary Ashcroft has a bold aesthetic, using machine embroidery also to add large strokes of texture to her piece emulating a paint brush. With this piece she brings together multiple textures of fabric as the embroidery act as the seam between Mac plastic, Velvet and Felt. This exposes the way the fabrics react differently to the introduction of the embroidery with the punched out nature of the plastic and the way the pile of the velvet peeks through the heavy stitching on the velvet areas.

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Naomi Bartling took a very different approach to the other graduates, using embroidery to bring together many different elements to built a multitude of colour texture and interest. This eclectic approach to her embroidery created some really eye catching pieces as we took apart existing hair pieces and corsages, and reassembled them. We also produced this moss covered piece for her, embellished with a range of 3D beaded motifs.

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Palmina Cerullo from the University for the Creative Arts went for a more traditional embroidery route, with her hand embroidered blue bullion work chair designs. The punchy colours of the bullion stands out wonderfully against the suiting fabrics.

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If you would like to get in contact with us about a project you are working on, please drop us an email, we would love to hear your ideas…