Hawthorne & Heaney on New Designers

Every June, Islington’s Business Design Centre plays host to some of the most exciting offerings this years graduates have to bring in the New Designers Exhibition Part 1. Hawthorne and Heaney  went down to see what it was all about this year and to bring you the most exciting pieces. With the show split into sections where each university champions their best students, there is plenty to see.

Nottingham Trent University exhibited some work from students such as Hannah Croft of Muuna. Her work has a beautiful crystalline quality as she blurs the line between minerals and fabric fusing them together. She combines practises from her experience as an embroidery and woven designer to create these visually intriguing pieces.

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There was also work by Josey Mendez who works predominately with CAD embroidery and fabric manipulation to create this collection which she exhibited called ‘Movement of Nature’ which is inspired by the contrast of shorelines.

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Rosamund Hanny has produced a very beautiful collection of samples which include pages technique, CAD and ombre tassels to create these elegant installations which traverse art, textile design and fashion. Featured were pieces from her award winning collection ‘Wings and Feathers’ as well as a piece from her anticipated new collection  ‘Fins and Scales’. Inspired by the natural world, Hanny’s work is underpinned by a strong ethical design philosophy. Incorporating environmentally conscious processes such as exhaust dyeing, along with up-cycled materials including vintage wedding dress silks

‘Wings and Feathers is a textile art installation inspired by the vibrancy and fragility of nature. The work synchronises traditional and contemporary techniques to create overworked and innovative textile pieces, incorporating digital and hand embroidery, sublimation printing and exhaust dyeing.’

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Another designer who stood out from the One Year On section was Alice Wheatley of ‘This is Alice’ . Her glass wear pieces have an other worldly quality with their body parts captured in the glass which is both intriguing and unsettling.

‘This is a concept installation, a reflection of entrapment. This is indiscriminate and indifferent, a fateful episode. This is suppressed and secreted, an estrangement from being. This is an existence, a life with consequences. This is a restriction and confinement, a history of forgotten and forsaken people. This is somebody else’s life, a moment, take a look. This is Alice.’

AliceWheatleyfeet AliceWheatley mouth AliceWheatley eyeThe new designers exhibition is only on for a few days each year so make sure you watch out for the window of opportunity to see the collection while it is on. The best of luck to all the new graduates which showed and well done! We are already looking forward to next year…

Hawthorne & Heaney on Vintage Embroideries

Hawthorne & Heaney is having a bit of a clear out at the moment and so we have decided to let some of our archive vintage embroidery pieces go. We would love to see them go to a good home, where they will be appreciated as much asthey deserve to be. Below you can see a selection of the pieces we have currently available on ebay. If you would like to have your own piece, why not see what the listing have to offer.

 

Green Lady Wall Hanging

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Ecclesiastical Robe Ornaments (Cross Stitch)

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Victorian Lace Sleeve

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Ecclesiastical Robe Ornaments (Gold Wire)

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Hawthorne & Heaney at Mademoiselle Prive

As with all of Saachi‘s exhibitions, there is plenty to see at the Mademoiselle Prive Exhibition which is currently on show. By the nature of the building, you become completely emersed into the brand once you are in and I was surpised to find that the exhibition was more about the brand itself rather than the products that they create. This said, there is no shortage of things to see with rooms dedicated to the fragrances, jewellery collection, fashion, fabrics, symbols and gardens of the House of Chanel.

As there is so much to include, we would just like to share a few of our highlights from an embroidery perspective. The textures room  is a great one to visit as they have huge swathes of the classic Chanel cloths hanging from the ceiling for you to wander through and brush off. This also links in with the presentation of some of the symbols and ‘lucky charms’ of Chanel such as the interlocking ‘Cs’, Wheat, Pearls and Camellias which once highlighted, you can fail to see everywhere.

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In the upper rooms, they are holding workshops through out the day, if you are lucky enough to get a place on one where they are teaching embroidery, flower making and fragrance combinations. It is here that there were what was the most interesting part from an embrodierers persepctive, the samples from Lesage and Lemarie. The combinations of textures and classic Chanel elements were really lovely.

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There were was also a display of some of the Lemarie Camillias that can be seen dotted through the collections and the tools they use to make them. The antique look to the tools reminds you how distingished this House is, but by the way they make them and continue to use them keeps the final product looking fresh and modern.

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The garments themseleves take somewhat of a back seat in this exhibition, used simply to display the diamonds against in one room and as a stand for the embroidered fabrics in the other. In this room there is plenty of tambour bead work, feather and fabric manipulation to enjoy, inpiration for any budding designer.

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The Mademoiselle Prive Exhibition is only on until 1st November 2015, so don’t miss out on your chance to see it while its in London and pick your own highlights from what is on show.

Antico Setificio Fiorentino

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Anytime we come across a brand or a maker who shares an ethos with us we like to share them with you and Antico Setificio Fiorentino is one such brand. They make beautiful, traditional silks on handwoven looms in the San Frediano in Florentine tradition as they have since 1786. Their website and literature is a veritable what’s what of silk, explaining the differences in the silks and their corresponding patterns in exceptional detail. From Erminsino to Filaticcio, Broccatello to Lampasso even a textiles enthusiast feels like they have learned something from visiting their world.

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Their website is definitely worth a visit with lots of striking images and hypnotic video clips of the looms. It gives a great sense of the scale of time it must take to make a batch of made to measure cloth. The delicate threads and fibres weave seamlessly through the looms, some of which date back to the 18th century and are based on the original designs of Leonardo Di Vinci. Antico Setificio Fiorentino go to great efforts to share with the public the art of weaving, as they recently exhibited the Di Vinci warping machine in Milan in April. They also have an ongoing project with the State Archives of Florence to restore and digitise ancient volumes of the Art of Silk and the Art of Wool in order to preserve this rare insight into weaving of the past.

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It’s lovely to see such passion and enthusiasm for an ancient craft and that it still has a place and desirability in current textile production. However with such an eye for detail and quality as is seen here, it is no surprise that they continue to thrive.

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