Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week

What were you doing last week? Specifically 9-13 May. Did you manage to catch London Craft Week? Well, it’s alright if you missed it, because we are here to share with you what we did and learned!

This festival that spans across London celebrates British and international creativity. Covering a vast range of disciplines, it brought together over 200 established and emerging makers, designers, brands and galleries from around the world.

We started our journey in the heart of English bespoke tailoring- Savile Row. The Row that is entrenched deep in history, famous worldwide, houses over 100 craftsman in more than a dozen bespoke tailoring business. It is a community that not only produces the esteemed English luxurious product but is active in training new craftsman. We had the chance to attend an hour-long masterclass pattern cutting at Henry Poole & Co.  In the brief hour, taught by one of the cutters about dinner jackets, he engaged us on the construction of the trouser pattern. First, measurement was taken off a gentleman in the room, then he moved onto crafting the pattern. Primarily using the Centre Front Centre Back cutting system, where scales and mathematics are used to give proportions so as to draft for the body of the customer.

 

Dinner Suit Trouser Pattern Cutting Process | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Henry Poole & Co Ltd Suits | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

After the hour, we gained a heightened respect for the craft of tailoring. Behind one jacket, it involves roughly 10 artisans, who engage in the making of the various sections of the garment. They perfect the moulding and shaping of the fabric so that it sits perfectly on the body. Bespoke tailoring suits are certainly a class of their own in both elegance and comfort.

Next, we ventured down to Sloane Square, to discover Maria Svarbova’s photography series that was the inspiration behind Delpozo Spring Summer 2018 ‘Musicalia’ collection. We were blown away by the beautiful photographs, that has this retro-futuristic. The artist describes the series as having a sense of ‘artificial detachment’, although set in a retro environment, ‘the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.’, the moment is frozen in time. In addition, the symmetrical composition enhances the ethereal quality.

Image: Maria Svarbova

Looking at the collection alongside the photographs, there is much resemblance in the colour palette. Creative director, Josep Font skillfully translated the swimming pool blue that ripples throughout the photographs, into the choice of the fabric and embroidery. Complimenting them with pastel shades of yellow, pink, and definitely the shocking red, there is a sense of a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

In addition, the geometric lines and stillness of the pool, reminds us of the intimate atmosphere at the atelier; cool, architectural and beautiful, a style synonym with the brand.

Lastly, we headed to the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize at the Design Museum, that will be held till 17 June. This exhibition best summarises craft and artistic endeavours all over the world. Exhibiting a range of international works that stretch across practices, such as ceramics, papercraft, woodwork to jewellery. Entering the exhibition, visitors are provided with an audio guide, that gives a detailed explanations about the works, aiding further appreciation and understanding of the craft in view.

One theme that ran throughout all the works exhibited is that there are continued efforts made to revive traditional techniques alongside pushing the boundaries of the skill. An example is a winning piece by Jennifer Lee, who mixed metallic oxides into clay to create colour, a technique that she discovered. Complimenting this avant-garde colouring technique, with an ancient practice of pinching and coiling clay, it resulted in the creation of a beautiful speckled surface. The varying gradient of bands that encircle the piece, resembles time frozen between traditional and contemporary.

Jennifer Lee (Winning Prize) Pale, Shadowed Speckled Traces, Fading Elipse, Bronze Specks, Tilted Shelf, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Another work, that we truly appreciate is by Takuro Kuwata’s Tea Bowl. Unlike traditional potters, who often aims to hide any cracks in their work, Kuwata defies that norm. He enhances the impression of chaos, that is natural to the unpredictable nature of ceramics, by making it the feature point of his work. By combining porcelain with platinum and steel, he challenges the possibility of materials. The melted and crack surface of the work is complemented with the saturated green patina, that makes the work contemporary and elegant.

Takuro Kuwata, Tea Bowl, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Embroidery is also celebrated at this exhibition! Richard McVetis, who is captivated by the meditative nature of the process, draws with needle and thread. He embroidered sixty cubes over the duration of sixty hours, materialising time into something tactile and visual.

 

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Perched on 60 beams, the 60 cubes remind me of the globe of islands, but in a square. It is a rather fun way of curating the world and plays on the idea that the world is not round but square.

London Craft Week is truly a celebration of hands that spans multiple disciplines. It makes us cherish and esteem the time and energy that goes into crafting beautiful objects. Unlike mass produced items that are often regarded as disposable, the work of the hand interweaves personal stories and beauty into everything made. In this age of mass consumption and disposal, we are glad that there is a renaissance in the appreciation of creativity and craft worldwide. We at Hawthorne & Heaney, are definitely standing behind that resurgence and hope to safeguard the shared heritage of craft.

Hawthorne & Heaney lends a helping hand

Its that time of year again, fashion and textile graduates will know what we mean.

Your design tutor who has finally signed off on your incredibly ambitious embroidery design for your final collection / portfolio.  They love it and have uttered the immortal words “but I want to see more”.

After a few brief moments of relief the creeping panic begins to set in.  A look over the calendar confirms it.  There is just not enough time for one person to achieve all this for deadline !

Don’t worry we are here to help !!  Hawthorne & Heaney specialise in fast turnaround and as a larger percentage of our work is made in London ordering, design changes and pick up/drop off are streamlines to cut days of standard lead times.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney have helped many students over the years at graduate level including Claire Barrow and Ashley Williams !

Give us a call 020 7637 5736 or drop us an email info@embroidery.london

Hawthorne & Heaney goes BIG!

You have heard Hawthorne & Heaney talk a lot about the work we do for interiors projects around the globe.  The challenges of scale, regulations and time lines that come along side these projects don’t make them the easiest, but do make them very exciting and regularly push the boundaries of what we can achieve at Hawthorne & Heaney.

 

For the past couple of months our studio has been working closely with our manufacturing team on an idea which changes the way we, as embroiderers, work with large format embroideries.  

After significant investment in production and logistics Hawthorne & Heaney is very excited to launch our service offering 

LARGE SCALE EMBROIDERY PRODUCTION

 

The service is perfect for those looking for a couple of meters for bespoke apparel, up to hundreds of meters to complete large scale interior design projects.

 

Our design and production teams can advise on base fabrics and can help work within a budget if specified.

We can assist with design and produce a range of samples for your clients for approval in advance of placing an order and we are of course happy to sample without a commitment to a quantity order.

 

Embroidery is the perfect way to make your project stand out and Hawthorne & Heaney can help achieve the subtlest of highlights to the boldest of ideas across nearly all interiors fabrics.

Prices start at £35 per meter.  If you would like to make an enquiry give us a call 0044 (0) 20 7637 5736 or pop us an email info@embroidery.london.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue!

There is nothing worse when a beloved item of clothing becomes damaged! whether it be a tear or a pesky moth has taken a bite.

While this may feel like the end of an item. Fear not, with a bit of embroidery we can bring your garment back to life!

With some tricks up our sleeves and a creative eye. We brought new life to this cashmere coat with some Goldwork bees!

Even though there were only a few holes we added more bees to make them a feature of the coat. 

We have also come to the aid of split seams! this beautiful tartan jacket came to us. One of our very talented embroiderer, designed this stunning humming bird with blues and yellows.

One Bird just want enough!

Let us know your thoughts! 

Hawthorne & Heaney Monogramming Event for the NBA

Following on from the sucess of the NFL event we did in October last year, we went back to the O2 area in January for an NBA event. Once again we were monogramming caps for the invited few in the skypod box overlooking the arena.

This time we were at the NBA game at the O2 arena embroidering initials on to New Era caps for the pregame Marriott reward VIP’s. The VIP’s could choose from either a Boston Celtics or a Philadelphia 76ers cap and have it personalised while they waited!

Check out some of the photos from the event:  



If you were lucky enough to get your hands on one of these caps we would love to see a photo! Tag us on Instagram @hawthorneheaney or #HHdoNBA

 

By Charlotte Pearson

Hawthorne & Heaney :Dismantling of a Victorian Mourning Shawl

WHO, WHAT & WHY?

Hawthorne & Heaney was given the Victorian shawl by Sue Thomas from Savile Row bespoke.

HISTORY

In the Victorian era, black was considered the appropriate colour to be worn when mourning the loss of a loved one and in some cultures, this is still the case today. It is believed that the mourning attire was a protection against negative thoughts. By wearing the colour black it also informed family, friends and acquaintances that the wearer had recently lost someone close to them and was a warning not to approach them within this sad period of time. For women, the fashion symbolised the depth of affliction with the colour of clothing indicating the gradual return from black to bold clothing through the hues of purple and violet, this was recognised as the second stage of mourning. The length of time Victorian women wore mourning garments varied on the degree of relationship with the deceased from a week up to a year.

DISMANTLING OF THE SHAWL

The dismantling of the shawl was a very long process as parts of the shawl was originally constructed using an embroidery technique called tambour beading. Tambour is French for drum and is done by using a hook where the fabric is stretched as tight as a drum. The fabric can be stretched by being sewn onto a rectangular frame or placed in a wooden hoop. The Tambour hook makes a chain stitch in a technical order where it will keep each bead securely in place. If the knot or process of the tambour chain stitch was to be done incorrectly then the whole beadwork would come undone. Depending on your experience using the Tambour technique beads can be secured in place very fast this is why a lot of fashion houses such as Dior are well known for using this technique in order to get garments completed on a tight time schedule. To get each bead loose from the shawl the embroidery stitches were cut allowing the bead to be free. Once all the beads were eventually dismantled from the Victorian shawl they were sorted into bags so all the same beads were neatly secured and measured ready to be used again. Below you are able to see photographs of sections from the shawl being dismantled.

NEW PURPOSE

It is very important to Hawthorne & Heaney that the beads are used in another exciting project. This is because of the heritage behind this shawl and the construction that went into the making of it was exquisite. With the shawl being so old it was beginning to fall apart and unable to be restored therefore there was no other option but to take it apart and store the beads safely away until we find a project that will give them a new purpose. We are unsure currently what that project will be but we are sure we will know when the time comes.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

When a major fashion exhibtion comes to London, we love to go and see what it is all about and the Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Exhibition currently on at the Victoria and Albert Museum does not disappoint. Based in the fashion and textiles section of the museum, the exhibition goes through from the beginnings of Balenciaga as a brand, through to current designers that Balenciaga has influenced.

Starting downstairs, most of the historical garments and accessories are displayed with accompanying notes and toiles. There are a few pieces which have a video animation next to them of how the pattern goes together to make the garment function which are very informative and really demonstrate the complexity of the designs:

#balenciaga @vamuseum #patterncutting

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This accompanies the actual garment which it explains as well as a calico toile of the garment. A few pieces from the collection have been x-rayed as can be seen in the back of the next video which shows the many layers that go into a piece like this and the hidden support within some of the ‘simpler’ looking gowns.

@vamuseum #balenciaga #fashion #london

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X-ray photograph of silk taffeta evening dress by Cristóbal Balenciaga, 1955, Paris, France. X-ray by Nick Veasey, 2016. © Nick Veasey

They have a section which is dedicated to the fabric choices and embroideries used in some of the historical Balenciaga pieces. These include a wonderfully rich example of silk shading on a gown with an impossibly tiny waist and a very decadent textured jacket. The base embroidery of the jacket is demonstrated by an embroiderer from Paris based embroiderers Lesage recreating the design. See below for a snippet of the tambour beading over long silk stitching.

Wild silk evening dress (detail), Cristóbal Balenciaga with embroidery by Lesage, 1960 – 2, Paris, France. Museum no. T.27-1974. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Going through the exhibition, the different approaches to each of the pieces are explained as Cristobal Balenciaga applied both tailoring and dressmaking techniques to his pieces. He was know for his surgical precision, often pictured in a lab coat measuring and remeasuring sections. A selection of traditional tailoring tools are displyed including shears, pressing ham, chalk shaving box and tracing wheel.

Cristóbal Balenciaga at work, 1968, Paris, France. Photograph by Henri Cartier-Bresson. © Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum PhotosMoving upstairs, the exhibition focuses more on Balenciagas lasting legacy and those he has inspired. Against the dombed ceiling, three videos of current designers such as Mollie Goddard and Gareth Pugh who speak about how Balenciaga has influenced them and their design work. A series of parallels are drawn between contemporary designs and historical Balenciaga pieces such as the below by Hussein Chalayan and Oscar De La Renta which are likened to textured coat and silk work dress previous mentioned.

This exhibition is a well rounded insight into the Balenciaga brand with lots of lovely couture examples and the technical specification to go with them which is interesting for those with and without exisiting fashion knowledge.  Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion will be running at the Victoria and Albert Museum‘s Fashion and Textiles Gallery Space (Room 40) until Sunday 18th February 2018 so if you have the opportunity to see it, it is worth the visit. Tickets cost £12.00 and some concessions are available.

All images and videos courtsey of Natasha Searls-Punter (@tashasearlspunter) unless otherwise stated.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kent and Curwen A/W 2017

It’s exciting to announce that Hawthorne & Heaney have worked with Kent and Curwen to produce beautiful embroidered badges for their new collection.

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Kent & Curwen, was first established in 1926, ‘two years after Eric Kent and Dorothy Curwen first crossed paths on Savile Row’. The company was described as a sports related gentlemen’s fashion brand that first began as a manufacturer of military, club, and college repp ties. In 1972, K&C had a defining moment when they produced kits for both England and Australia in the Ashes. The relationship with The England team lasted for well over ’20 years, supplying knits and caps well into the Nineties’.

cricket team

As of recent, David Beckham has joined Kent and Curwen in a partnership, acting as a brand ambassador and to us he is the perfect fit – ‘a true gentleman, celebrated for his fashion style and the British sports hero of his generation’.

Working with creative director Daniel Kearns, they have both created a collection ‘of everything a man would want to wear right now’. From ‘sun-faded rugby shirts, classic outerwear to English heritage knits.’ Most of these products bears a badge that reflects the heritage of Kent & Curwen – the Three Lions and the English Rose. These embroidered badges are both long held symbols of the brand and we at Hawthorne & Heaney are delighted at the way they turned out!

kent and cerwin

Kent & Curwen launched this collection as part of London Fashion Week Mens and in an interview with WWD, Kearns expressed that this collection aims to appeal to a new British generation. The collection is now on selling on the Kent & Curwen’s website and Mr Porter so check it out to get your hands on it.

Kent and Curwen are seriously embarking on a new chapter in their rich history and we are so excited to be part of that.

Find out a bit more about the K&C here:

References:

WGSN – https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/david-beckham-to-help-design-kent-curwens-autumnwinter-2016-collection/#

Kent and Curwen official website – https://www.kentandcurwen.com/heritage/

GQ – http://www.gq.com/story/david-beckhams-kent-curwen-new-menswear-line

By Hasina

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Joshua Kane A/W 2017

JOSH KANE aw17 ticket

On Friday night, Hawthorne & Heaney were a few of the audience members to watch the the fashion show of Joshua Kane’s A/W 2017 collection. Held at the London Palladium, it was a grand affair with 2250 people eagerly watching as Kane wanted to be able to share the experience with his fans as well as the high fashion crowd. Therefore, tickets were available for anyone to buy, attend and enjoy.

Entitled, ‘Journey’ the brand did not disappoint with an amazing set of intricate lattice work depicting a early 20th century tube station, newly built and creating a social microcosm of it’s own as the classes mingle. On this we were introduced to the narative with a couple of models interacting briefly before the main body of the show got started.

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The shows itself was crisp, sharp and well polished as is only fitting for a Joshua Kane collection. Not only was this show unusual to be shared with the wider audience in this way, but was also Kane’s first show that was an equal split of mens and womenswear. The line up finished with the three looks which Hawthorne & Heaney produced embroidered pieces for, in the form of a horse head, with chess board, military and heraldic influences.

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Great to see some of my embroidery on the runway this evening @hawthorneheaney #joshuakanejourney #embroidery #lfw

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The show finished with a moving performance by the two models/dancers that we were introduced to at the start.

A beautiful presentation of tailoring from last nights fashion show #joshuakanejourney #ballet #suits

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As always it was lovely to be involved in an exciting project like this, particulally with such as beautiful outcome and was wonderful to see them on their debut in person. If you would like to seemore of the collection follow the link here. We are looking forward to what they produce for next season already!