Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects

Hawthorne & Heaney has been very fortunate to have a series of wonderful students who come to the studio as interns to learn about the industry and experience a working studio. But what do they actually do while they are with us I hear you ask?

 

What they work on day to day is very changeable but for our longer term interns we like them to have a project of their own ongoing whilst they are with us. The gorgeous images you see here are from our most recent intern, Elsie Wong who was working on some floral motifs for us along side her other duties.

She draws on her Singaporean heritage and Central Saint Martins experience to bring her clean yet delicate style to these pieces. 

She then went on to translate one of the pieces into embroidery using one of the techniques learnt in her classes at the London Embroidery School, specifically Limerick Lace. 

Here is is presenting her final piece to us demonstrating the design process from design, to draft, to embroidery.  I’m sure you will agree, great job Elsie! What do you think?

If this has taken your fancy and you would like to join us as an intern, please see the internships blog or jobs section of the website for application as we are currently looking for someone to join us for an immediate start.

Hawthorne & Heaney does Wedding Details

Wedding Napkins; you may think you have seen all there is to see when it comes to wedding napkins. But let us take a moment of your time to show you some of the more unusual napkins we have done.

Super Lux: For a very plush, luxurious finish, these napkins were personalised with individuals initials which we embroidered metallic threads over raisings for added texture.

An Extra Touch:

If you have a theme that you wish to incorporate into your designs, we can create semi bespoke orders using one of the stock font choices with your bespoke artwork addition like the crown in this one.

 

Vintage feel:

Sometimes the crisp, shiny quality of the machine embroidery threads don’t quite make the perfect fit with what you are trying to achieve with your theme. Take this couple who wanted a more natural feel to their embroidery to match the natural feel of the linen so we used a cotton thread instead which is matte and lends itself well to the hand finished feel.

Bespoke Monograms:

Using the matte cotton threads again for this set which has a gorgeous lace boarder, they picked out an off white for the stitching to keep it neutral, but still clear against the white of the napkin. The wrapping, intimate nature of the letters was very important to this design so special attention has been paid to the ‘unders and overs’ of the letters.

International Reach:

The latin alphabet may not properly reflect the culture of your union, so don’t think that you have to be restricted to your ‘ABCs’ for your embroidery.

 

Whatever you have in mind, get in touch and we can see what we can create for your special day.

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton’s Retrospective

FASHION IN MOTION

Holly Fulton

Fashion in Motion: Holly Fulton | Image: Chris Taylor

On 20th July, we attended Fashion in Motion featuring Holly Fulton at the Victoria and Albert Museum. It was a spectacular retrospective of the label, that featured highlights from past seasons. We sat eagerly and were anxious to get a snapshot of how the label has evolved over the years. As the shows began, we were not disappointed, Fulton sent down models decked out in beautiful and complex graphic embellishments, laid out in eye catching bold colours..

She restyled the looks, so as to create a more congruent show. In spite of the varied colour palettes and array of inspiration that stretches across 6 seasons, she succeeded in highlighting her unique visual aesthetic that couples with her hand rendered backdrop. Below are some of the looks:

Holly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Holly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Holly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

The collection that we liked the most was Spring Summer 2016, seen in the two looks below. She drew inspiration from Eileen Agar, who collage decorative elements with nature. Fulton skillfully translated the spiral seashell shapes and kaleidoscope colour palette into her prints and embellishment. And she even included a cascading tail into the mix, that were balanced out with well orchestrated and balanced proportions.

Holly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney Holly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Eileen Agar | The return of the Blues

Holly Fulton | Image: Yanyun

After this opportunity to feast on Holly’s designs, we are excited to see what the designer would sent down the runway in the coming fashion week.

 

By Elsie Wong

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week

What were you doing last week? Specifically 9-13 May. Did you manage to catch London Craft Week? Well, it’s alright if you missed it, because we are here to share with you what we did and learned!

This festival that spans across London celebrates British and international creativity. Covering a vast range of disciplines, it brought together over 200 established and emerging makers, designers, brands and galleries from around the world.

We started our journey in the heart of English bespoke tailoring- Savile Row. The Row that is entrenched deep in history, famous worldwide, houses over 100 craftsman in more than a dozen bespoke tailoring business. It is a community that not only produces the esteemed English luxurious product but is active in training new craftsman. We had the chance to attend an hour-long masterclass pattern cutting at Henry Poole & Co.  In the brief hour, taught by one of the cutters about dinner jackets, he engaged us on the construction of the trouser pattern. First, measurement was taken off a gentleman in the room, then he moved onto crafting the pattern. Primarily using the Centre Front Centre Back cutting system, where scales and mathematics are used to give proportions so as to draft for the body of the customer.

 

Dinner Suit Trouser Pattern Cutting Process | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Henry Poole & Co Ltd Suits | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

After the hour, we gained a heightened respect for the craft of tailoring. Behind one jacket, it involves roughly 10 artisans, who engage in the making of the various sections of the garment. They perfect the moulding and shaping of the fabric so that it sits perfectly on the body. Bespoke tailoring suits are certainly a class of their own in both elegance and comfort.

Next, we ventured down to Sloane Square, to discover Maria Svarbova’s photography series that was the inspiration behind Delpozo Spring Summer 2018 ‘Musicalia’ collection. We were blown away by the beautiful photographs, that has this retro-futuristic. The artist describes the series as having a sense of ‘artificial detachment’, although set in a retro environment, ‘the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.’, the moment is frozen in time. In addition, the symmetrical composition enhances the ethereal quality.

Image: Maria Svarbova

Looking at the collection alongside the photographs, there is much resemblance in the colour palette. Creative director, Josep Font skillfully translated the swimming pool blue that ripples throughout the photographs, into the choice of the fabric and embroidery. Complimenting them with pastel shades of yellow, pink, and definitely the shocking red, there is a sense of a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

In addition, the geometric lines and stillness of the pool, reminds us of the intimate atmosphere at the atelier; cool, architectural and beautiful, a style synonym with the brand.

Lastly, we headed to the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize at the Design Museum, that will be held till 17 June. This exhibition best summarises craft and artistic endeavours all over the world. Exhibiting a range of international works that stretch across practices, such as ceramics, papercraft, woodwork to jewellery. Entering the exhibition, visitors are provided with an audio guide, that gives a detailed explanations about the works, aiding further appreciation and understanding of the craft in view.

One theme that ran throughout all the works exhibited is that there are continued efforts made to revive traditional techniques alongside pushing the boundaries of the skill. An example is a winning piece by Jennifer Lee, who mixed metallic oxides into clay to create colour, a technique that she discovered. Complimenting this avant-garde colouring technique, with an ancient practice of pinching and coiling clay, it resulted in the creation of a beautiful speckled surface. The varying gradient of bands that encircle the piece, resembles time frozen between traditional and contemporary.

Jennifer Lee (Winning Prize) Pale, Shadowed Speckled Traces, Fading Elipse, Bronze Specks, Tilted Shelf, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Another work, that we truly appreciate is by Takuro Kuwata’s Tea Bowl. Unlike traditional potters, who often aims to hide any cracks in their work, Kuwata defies that norm. He enhances the impression of chaos, that is natural to the unpredictable nature of ceramics, by making it the feature point of his work. By combining porcelain with platinum and steel, he challenges the possibility of materials. The melted and crack surface of the work is complemented with the saturated green patina, that makes the work contemporary and elegant.

Takuro Kuwata, Tea Bowl, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Embroidery is also celebrated at this exhibition! Richard McVetis, who is captivated by the meditative nature of the process, draws with needle and thread. He embroidered sixty cubes over the duration of sixty hours, materialising time into something tactile and visual.

 

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Perched on 60 beams, the 60 cubes remind me of the globe of islands, but in a square. It is a rather fun way of curating the world and plays on the idea that the world is not round but square.

London Craft Week is truly a celebration of hands that spans multiple disciplines. It makes us cherish and esteem the time and energy that goes into crafting beautiful objects. Unlike mass produced items that are often regarded as disposable, the work of the hand interweaves personal stories and beauty into everything made. In this age of mass consumption and disposal, we are glad that there is a renaissance in the appreciation of creativity and craft worldwide. We at Hawthorne & Heaney, are definitely standing behind that resurgence and hope to safeguard the shared heritage of craft.

Hawthorne & Heaney lends a helping hand

Its that time of year again, fashion and textile graduates will know what we mean.

Your design tutor who has finally signed off on your incredibly ambitious embroidery design for your final collection / portfolio.  They love it and have uttered the immortal words “but I want to see more”.

After a few brief moments of relief the creeping panic begins to set in.  A look over the calendar confirms it.  There is just not enough time for one person to achieve all this for deadline !

Don’t worry we are here to help !!  Hawthorne & Heaney specialise in fast turnaround and as a larger percentage of our work is made in London ordering, design changes and pick up/drop off are streamlines to cut days of standard lead times.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney have helped many students over the years at graduate level including Claire Barrow and Ashley Williams !

Give us a call 020 7637 5736 or drop us an email info@embroidery.london

Hawthorne & Heaney goes BIG!

You have heard Hawthorne & Heaney talk a lot about the work we do for interiors projects around the globe.  The challenges of scale, regulations and time lines that come along side these projects don’t make them the easiest, but do make them very exciting and regularly push the boundaries of what we can achieve at Hawthorne & Heaney.

 

For the past couple of months our studio has been working closely with our manufacturing team on an idea which changes the way we, as embroiderers, work with large format embroideries.  

After significant investment in production and logistics Hawthorne & Heaney is very excited to launch our service offering 

LARGE SCALE EMBROIDERY PRODUCTION

 

The service is perfect for those looking for a couple of meters for bespoke apparel, up to hundreds of meters to complete large scale interior design projects.

 

Our design and production teams can advise on base fabrics and can help work within a budget if specified.

We can assist with design and produce a range of samples for your clients for approval in advance of placing an order and we are of course happy to sample without a commitment to a quantity order.

 

Embroidery is the perfect way to make your project stand out and Hawthorne & Heaney can help achieve the subtlest of highlights to the boldest of ideas across nearly all interiors fabrics.

Prices start at £35 per meter.  If you would like to make an enquiry give us a call 0044 (0) 20 7637 5736 or pop us an email info@embroidery.london.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

When a major fashion exhibtion comes to London, we love to go and see what it is all about and the Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Exhibition currently on at the Victoria and Albert Museum does not disappoint. Based in the fashion and textiles section of the museum, the exhibition goes through from the beginnings of Balenciaga as a brand, through to current designers that Balenciaga has influenced.

Starting downstairs, most of the historical garments and accessories are displayed with accompanying notes and toiles. There are a few pieces which have a video animation next to them of how the pattern goes together to make the garment function which are very informative and really demonstrate the complexity of the designs:

#balenciaga @vamuseum #patterncutting

A post shared by Tasha Searls-Punter (@tashasearlspunter) on

This accompanies the actual garment which it explains as well as a calico toile of the garment. A few pieces from the collection have been x-rayed as can be seen in the back of the next video which shows the many layers that go into a piece like this and the hidden support within some of the ‘simpler’ looking gowns.

@vamuseum #balenciaga #fashion #london

A post shared by Tasha Searls-Punter (@tashasearlspunter) on

X-ray photograph of silk taffeta evening dress by Cristóbal Balenciaga, 1955, Paris, France. X-ray by Nick Veasey, 2016. © Nick Veasey

They have a section which is dedicated to the fabric choices and embroideries used in some of the historical Balenciaga pieces. These include a wonderfully rich example of silk shading on a gown with an impossibly tiny waist and a very decadent textured jacket. The base embroidery of the jacket is demonstrated by an embroiderer from Paris based embroiderers Lesage recreating the design. See below for a snippet of the tambour beading over long silk stitching.

Wild silk evening dress (detail), Cristóbal Balenciaga with embroidery by Lesage, 1960 – 2, Paris, France. Museum no. T.27-1974. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Going through the exhibition, the different approaches to each of the pieces are explained as Cristobal Balenciaga applied both tailoring and dressmaking techniques to his pieces. He was know for his surgical precision, often pictured in a lab coat measuring and remeasuring sections. A selection of traditional tailoring tools are displyed including shears, pressing ham, chalk shaving box and tracing wheel.

Cristóbal Balenciaga at work, 1968, Paris, France. Photograph by Henri Cartier-Bresson. © Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum PhotosMoving upstairs, the exhibition focuses more on Balenciagas lasting legacy and those he has inspired. Against the dombed ceiling, three videos of current designers such as Mollie Goddard and Gareth Pugh who speak about how Balenciaga has influenced them and their design work. A series of parallels are drawn between contemporary designs and historical Balenciaga pieces such as the below by Hussein Chalayan and Oscar De La Renta which are likened to textured coat and silk work dress previous mentioned.

This exhibition is a well rounded insight into the Balenciaga brand with lots of lovely couture examples and the technical specification to go with them which is interesting for those with and without exisiting fashion knowledge.  Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion will be running at the Victoria and Albert Museum‘s Fashion and Textiles Gallery Space (Room 40) until Sunday 18th February 2018 so if you have the opportunity to see it, it is worth the visit. Tickets cost £12.00 and some concessions are available.

All images and videos courtsey of Natasha Searls-Punter (@tashasearlspunter) unless otherwise stated.

Hawthorne & Heaney visits Peranakan Embroidery Boutiques in Singapore

During a recent visit to Singapore, one of the team at Hawthorne & Heaney took a sight detour off the tourist trail and visited one of the Peranakan Embroidery heritage boutiques in the suburbs. This small street houses a couple of shops in which they are keeping the more traditional embroidery techniques of the region alive. One such place is called Rumah Bebe which is lovely in itself as it is covered in patterned tiles and gilded woodwork. They house a wide range of Nyonya garments such as sarongs, embroidered jackets and beaded shoes. As is fitting to the work that has gone into them, the pieces are quite pricey, but well worth it for how lovely they are.

IMG_1420

Kim Choo Kueh Chang is also next door where you can sample traditional Nyonya cakes from the cafe downstairs made with coconut, condensed milk and pandan leaves which gives them a bright green colour. They have a little shop of trinkets but upstairs is where you will find the best bits as they have a range of embroidered pieces which line the walls and a variety of vintage items on diplay in their exhibition. They explain a little of how the embroidery is intergral to the wedding services of the culture with the examples around for context.

IMG_1415

IMG_1417

A personal favourite had to be this part completed design, still on the frame which demonstrates a little of the technique that is used to create these pieces and the scale of the beads that form the designs.

IMG_1413

IMG_1412

 

To see more of what they have to offer, visit their websites above or watch the video below for a glimpse of the action.

Hawthorne & Heaney for London Craft Week Part 1

For the past 3 years, London Craft Week has become a highlight of the creative calender with all sorts of exciting workshops, demonstrations and talks taking place across town. These celebrate the most unique and interesting craft skills London has to offer. Ranging from whisky tasting to watchmaking to weaving there is something to interest everyone. This year, we have been invited to take part in London Craft Week and are excited to be hosting two workshops in the studio to showcase our own skills.  In these workshops we will be teaching one of our stable skills, monogramming which we regulally use on shirts,  suits and accessories from our tailoring clients.

LCW1

You can join us to learn the delicate art of monogramming and leave with your own monogrammed handkerchief or cufflinks at the end. Follow the link to secure your place as spaces are strictly limited, tickets are £60 plus VAT and can only be bought directly from the London Craft Week Website.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Andrew Totah

Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.40.49This year we were lucky enough to work with a very promising CSM MA student called Andrew Totah. We produced a series of embroideries for him which feature in his final collection which are so vibrant and exciting, we couldn’t wait to share them with you.Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.40.36

Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.41.01

Andrew Totah’s collection is based on his travels through South Africa and features a wonderfully vibrant colour palette which reflects the culture. Andrew’s collection is very much about telling a story through his designs so his girls are superheroes of a kind who modify their clothes and empower themselves by take back control of their city in the night. Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.40.21

Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.41.52

We produced a series of heavily machine embroidered patches to compliment his collection, all of which were his own graphic designs. Most of the embroideries are raised from the surface of the fabric, that combined with the punchiness of the colours makes a strong impression.Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.42.19 Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 15.42.04

To see more about the collection and the inspiration behind the designs, as well as the embroidery on the garments shown in the show at the end then have a watch of the video below.