Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley

Here at Hawthorne & Heaney, we were very busy during London Craft Week. While having an explore around some exhibitions we also teamed up with John Smedley to personalise some of their lovely knitwear.

Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

Founded in 1784 they are one of the longest-running knitwear manufacturers in the world.  Specialising in beautifully designed garments that are made to last. Crafted in Britain and distributed all over the world.

Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

In 1825 they moved on to producing garments using one of the first ever fully fashioned knitting machines, creating the original “Long Johns”.

Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

Moving into the 1950s and 1960 the brand became very popular with many famous faces, from Audrey Hepburn to the Beatles. By the 1980s many British fashion houses saught the work of John Smedley, such as Paul Smith and Vivienne Westwood.

  Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

In 2013 they were granted the Royal Warrant of Appointment.

Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

Two of our wonderfully talented hand embroiderers spent the day in their Mayfair store, offering a little something extra to their knitwear.Hawthorne & Heaney teams up with John Smedley London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week

What were you doing last week? Specifically 9-13 May. Did you manage to catch London Craft Week? Well, it’s alright if you missed it, because we are here to share with you what we did and learned!

This festival that spans across London celebrates British and international creativity. Covering a vast range of disciplines, it brought together over 200 established and emerging makers, designers, brands and galleries from around the world.

We started our journey in the heart of English bespoke tailoring- Savile Row. The Row that is entrenched deep in history, famous worldwide, houses over 100 craftsman in more than a dozen bespoke tailoring business. It is a community that not only produces the esteemed English luxurious product but is active in training new craftsman. We had the chance to attend an hour-long masterclass pattern cutting at Henry Poole & Co.  In the brief hour, taught by one of the cutters about dinner jackets, he engaged us on the construction of the trouser pattern. First, measurement was taken off a gentleman in the room, then he moved onto crafting the pattern. Primarily using the Centre Front Centre Back cutting system, where scales and mathematics are used to give proportions so as to draft for the body of the customer.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Dinner Suit Trouser Pattern Cutting Process | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Henry Poole & Co Ltd Suits | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

After the hour, we gained a heightened respect for the craft of tailoring. Behind one jacket, it involves roughly 10 artisans, who engage in the making of the various sections of the garment. They perfect the moulding and shaping of the fabric so that it sits perfectly on the body. Bespoke tailoring suits are certainly a class of their own in both elegance and comfort.

Next, we ventured down to Sloane Square, to discover Maria Svarbova’s photography series that was the inspiration behind Delpozo Spring Summer 2018 ‘Musicalia’ collection. We were blown away by the beautiful photographs, that has this retro-futuristic. The artist describes the series as having a sense of ‘artificial detachment’, although set in a retro environment, ‘the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.’, the moment is frozen in time. In addition, the symmetrical composition enhances the ethereal quality.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Maria Svarbova

Looking at the collection alongside the photographs, there is much resemblance in the colour palette. Creative director, Josep Font skillfully translated the swimming pool blue that ripples throughout the photographs, into the choice of the fabric and embroidery. Complimenting them with pastel shades of yellow, pink, and definitely the shocking red, there is a sense of a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

In addition, the geometric lines and stillness of the pool, reminds us of the intimate atmosphere at the atelier; cool, architectural and beautiful, a style synonym with the brand.

Lastly, we headed to the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize at the Design Museum, that will be held till 17 June. This exhibition best summarises craft and artistic endeavours all over the world. Exhibiting a range of international works that stretch across practices, such as ceramics, papercraft, woodwork to jewellery. Entering the exhibition, visitors are provided with an audio guide, that gives a detailed explanations about the works, aiding further appreciation and understanding of the craft in view.

One theme that ran throughout all the works exhibited is that there are continued efforts made to revive traditional techniques alongside pushing the boundaries of the skill. An example is a winning piece by Jennifer Lee, who mixed metallic oxides into clay to create colour, a technique that she discovered. Complimenting this avant-garde colouring technique, with an ancient practice of pinching and coiling clay, it resulted in the creation of a beautiful speckled surface. The varying gradient of bands that encircle the piece, resembles time frozen between traditional and contemporary.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Jennifer Lee (Winning Prize) Pale, Shadowed Speckled Traces, Fading Elipse, Bronze Specks, Tilted Shelf, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Another work, that we truly appreciate is by Takuro Kuwata’s Tea Bowl. Unlike traditional potters, who often aims to hide any cracks in their work, Kuwata defies that norm. He enhances the impression of chaos, that is natural to the unpredictable nature of ceramics, by making it the feature point of his work. By combining porcelain with platinum and steel, he challenges the possibility of materials. The melted and crack surface of the work is complemented with the saturated green patina, that makes the work contemporary and elegant.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Takuro Kuwata, Tea Bowl, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Embroidery is also celebrated at this exhibition! Richard McVetis, who is captivated by the meditative nature of the process, draws with needle and thread. He embroidered sixty cubes over the duration of sixty hours, materialising time into something tactile and visual.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Perched on 60 beams, the 60 cubes remind me of the globe of islands, but in a square. It is a rather fun way of curating the world and plays on the idea that the world is not round but square.

London Craft Week is truly a celebration of hands that spans multiple disciplines. It makes us cherish and esteem the time and energy that goes into crafting beautiful objects. Unlike mass produced items that are often regarded as disposable, the work of the hand interweaves personal stories and beauty into everything made. In this age of mass consumption and disposal, we are glad that there is a renaissance in the appreciation of creativity and craft worldwide. We at Hawthorne & Heaney, are definitely standing behind that resurgence and hope to safeguard the shared heritage of craft.

Hawthorne & Heaney needs you !

OPEN CALL and VIP ACCESS

As artisans we are drawn to beautiful things.  

The art we work on is a reflection of our taste and dedication.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney needs you ! London Hand Embroidery

 

We asked ourselves why shouldn’t the the luxury we surround ourselves with daily be reflected in the tools of our trade.

As embroiderers, frustrated with hunting through the ever dwlinding treasure trove of vintage and second hand, we decided to create some tools that would be a pleasure to use, collect and admire.

After all the journey is as important as the destination !

 

Hawthorne & Heaney needs you ! London Hand Embroidery

 

The Heaney’s Haberdashery team want you to tell us about the tools you use.  Let us know your favourites and the reasons behind why.  

We are developing some long lost gems and we need your feedback on what tools you would like to see and why.

Sign up to the Newsletter to find out how you can get involved, VIP access to limited edition runs, Early Bird discount codes and updates on our progress.

Follow us on Instagram for a sneak peak on how things are going daily !

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The V&A: Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London

Just as you enter the V&A from the Grand Entrance on Cromwell Road, to your left you will come to this wonderful exhibit about the life of John Lockwood Kipling, Father of the famous poet, Rudyard Kipling. It’s not all that often that you get the opportunity to see this kind of Indian heritage, but on display at this exhibition, your senses are spoilt. Historical pictures of India through the Victorian ages, fused together with Lockwood Kipling’s own illustrations, structural designs and photography of his students in Mumbai.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The V&A: Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London London Hand Embroidery

 Exhibition entrance, courtesy of V&A
 This exhibition is great for those with keen interests print, architectural design, upholstery, embroidery, textiles (etc) and are in need of inspiration from this rich culture and its prominent history, or those that just want to expand on their knowledge of art history. The exhibit is atmospheric and full of vibrant information, you can easily lose yourself in here for a few hours, it is a fascinating period of history.

Lockwood Kipling was always an active social campaigner for the preservation of Indian arts and crafts, he even brought much of that skill he learnt in India back to England where he worked as an architectural sculptor for the V&A. The terracotta panels created by Lockwood can still be seen on the exterior of the grand V&A building. The perfect place to hold an exhibition about his colourful life.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The V&A: Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London London Hand Embroidery

Exhibition poster in the museum tunnel and exhibition leaflet from H&H visit to V&A

His passion for the preservation of Indian culture and skill is apparent throughout the entire exhibit, and it is wonderful to see techniques that have been used in traditional Indian culture for centuries. By including the work of his students at the Mayo College, Ajmer, the exhibit shows how his passion and knowledge has been transferred onto his students.

Kipling moved to India in 1865 when the country was under British rule, and at the time the economy was quite unstable. He recognised this uncertainty in his students and encouraged them to channel these feelings into their creativity.

In 1851 he trained as a designer and modeller, which gave him the knowledge which he took to India and applied this to the traditional crafts which he learnt and was able to design beautiful Mosques, some which still stand today. 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The V&A: Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London London Hand Embroidery

Painting: Entrance to the Mosque of Wazir Khan, by Mohammed Din, 1880, by Mohammed Din. Displayed at the exhibition

The intricate detailing on the architectural work is magnificent to see and his illustration style is timeless! He has captured a moment via drawing as if it were a photograph. A series of images seen at the exhibition depicts local craftsmen doing their everyday using the said skills making creations which later on Lockwood would go on to do himself.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The V&A: Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London London Hand Embroidery

Illustration: A wood carver from the North West Provinces of British India, by Lockwood Kipling, 1870.
Displayed as a series of natural drawings of craft workers.

If you are interested in how artistic crafts and merit is applied throughout different cultures, or just intrigued to see how ancient skills that are ingrained in the wonderful Indian culture have progressed and evolved over the past 200 years, then this exhibition is a must see.

By Amelia Beaumont-Dodd

Hawthorne & Heaney for Smythson’s London Craft Week Event

In addition to our own classes and exhibiting work at Anderson and Sheppard, we also were demonstrating goldwork at Smythson’s LCW event. They had a series of craftspeople set up in store to show some of the process that their items go through.

At the front of the store, Meg was positioned, drafting and embroidering the Smythson’s ‘S’ into a bespoke badge. This piece will have been drafted, raised, appliqued and embroidered with cutwork bullion.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Smythson's London Craft Week Event London Hand Embroidery

On another counter, one of their book binders was stationed, explianing the properties of the binding process that thie products go through, the importance of using 2 types of glue for each piece and why they have maintained their hand processes over using machines. Finally they had another lady applying the tissue linings into their envelopes which also all done by hand.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Smythson's London Craft Week Event London Hand Embroidery

They also had a lady doing freehand calligraphy, where you could write down your name for her and she would draw it out on a card for you to take home.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Smythson's London Craft Week Event London Hand Embroidery

Wonderful calligraphy writing at Smythson as part of London Craft Week #lcw2017 #calligraphy #craft @atmorgan

A post shared by Tasha Searls-Punter (@tashasearlspunter) on

There were so many great ways to get involved with Craft Week this year, we cant wait to see what they will have on next year as it gets bigger and bigger each year!

 

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week – 3rd – 7th May 2017

London Craft Week opens London’s studios and shops giving you an insight into the amazing industries around the city. By inviting you to see what amazing crafts happen, often behind the scenes with demonstrations and viewings and showing you skills and techniques traditional and recent. Hawthorne & Heaney have been very busy soaking up all that London has to offer this week, so far we have visited:

Nest design at Blacks Club- Soho.

This is an extraordinary interior company, with delightful staff explaining the fabric origins, methods of designing and previous client projects. Nest have an amazing collection of fabrics from all over the world; linens, velvet, silks, lace as well as dyed materials such as shibori and Tussar silk.

If you love fabrics and a variety of them it’s definitely worth heading over to Nest at Blacks to talk about the collection of beautiful samples as well as the great projects they have made.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Example of a client project in Spring Restaurant, Somerset House (photo taken from Nest design.co.uk) Beautiful lines of stitch, layering and vintage lace are highlighted as well as different opacities of linens.

Christian Louboutin -Mayfair

The Christian Louboutin shop was demonstrating leather tassel making which is part of their personalisation service of the shoe. The construction of these leather tassels was amazing to watch, the demonstrator did not speak English however the skill he had constructing the leather strips into delicate but fun tassels was a great process to watch and learn. It inspires you to have a go at making such decoration as he made it look so easy. (definitely isn’t easy!)

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Example of the hand made leather tassels on a boat style shoe.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Frette boutique

As you approached Fretta the window display was a wall of work of art with a painter part way through painting a full size design of flowers and leafs

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

The experience in Fretta was a treat with very helpful staff showing you around the shop, explaining fabrics, as well as browsing the beautiful luxury fabrics.

I spoke to Lucia Surace (CRM & Marketing Manager) who was able to show me through the personalisation of the collection and previous examples of embroidered items. The quality of fabrics they have there are so lovely, these including, bed linens made from egyptian cotton, throws and blankets made from cashmere, wool and silk, as well as table linens and towels.

Clients for the embroidery personalisation are often for mass for example for cruise ship towels.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above right: example of embroidered towels, part of their personalisation service.

Above left: table linens with the popular lace hole boarder.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above: photo of Fetta’s embroidered table linen.

I found Fretta well worth a visit to see the style and quality that they produce and to learn from the staff there.

The Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles – At Temple Gallery

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above image: Example of traditional Thai embroidery on garments in at Temple Gallery

The Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles was founded by Her Majesty Queen Sirikit within the Grand Palace grounds in Bangkok and officially opened in 2012. This will be the museum’s first London visit, celebrating the Khon, Thailand’s oldest narrative dance forms. This exhibit is placed in the most beautiful building, Temple Gallery, located just a short walk from Temple Station. On display at the exhibit is a wonderful array of various examples of the skill which has been used to make such magnificent garments, passed down through generations, to even make garments suitable to be worn by people now.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Images above: Examples of the traditional Thai garments on display, as well as a close up of the lavish accessories

In this exhibit, we see cultures come together. There were embroidery techniques that have been apparent in our own culture for centuries, examples of this we see in our heritage museums. What a treat it was to see them on traditional Thai garments in such a wonderful building, and just like us, the skill of all of this has been lovingly passed on through generations, person to person.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Images above: examples of Goldwork on a traditional Thai collar

The Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles was founded on Her Majesty’s efforts to ensure the preservation of Thailand’s textile arts for future generations. In 1976 the museum was established with the objective to help people in rural areas to gain supplementary income and in doing this, Her Majesty realised just how wonderful and truly unique the hand woven silk by villagers is.

Making A Mackintosh – At Mackintosh

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: Equipment used by Mackintosh

Glasgow has always been known for its work ethic and producing hand made goods and of course its tireless war efforts. Hard working Glaswegians have been producing Mackintosh coats since 1824!

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: Demonstration of the rubber glue being applied to pattern pieces

On entering, I was warmly welcomed by the lovely Factory and Production Managers of the Mackintosh factory in Glasgow, Scott Sheridan and John McGuire who have worked for the Mackintosh factory for 40 years. They gave me a fantastic demonstration on how the pattern pieces are glued, attached and arranged to ensure that they are functional and waterproof.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Images: Glue being applied to the button-fly of the coat, then the piece is folded over and a heavy rolling tool is applied to ensure the two pieces have stuck with no air bubbles

The demonstration was very engaging, it was so informative seeing how much time and care goes into one coat. On a basic coat, there is 25 pattern pieces, and each one is passed through different departments in the Glasgow factory before completion. I watched on as they applied glue to the pattern pieces with their index fingers, using a lot of force and pressure to get the technique correct, using the same tools and glue that the people who did it before them would have used.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: Example of the pocket patterns, tin of glue and traditional rolling tool

It is very obvious on going to this exhibit to see that Mackintosh is a company of tradition and efficiency. It was a treat for me to be able to see this tradition which has carried on through different generations and also have explained to me how the company has expanded to keep up with popular demands, cultural and even climate changes through the years. Such as detachable collars/hoods, varying fabrics and changes in the way we use our coats and what for. The traditional Mackintosh coats are still made in Glasgow, with the same glue and the same equipment as they always have been.

Shoe Making at Edward Green

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above images: Left: Demonstration of Andy Peach sewing the two front pieces that make the shoe. Right image: See front seam for example of what Andy is currently working on

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: Close up of stitching on shoe, done with boar hair

Northampton has always been closely associated with shoemaking and that became very apparent to me upon entering this exhibit at Edward Green and seeing the demonstration. Andy Peach, a fantastic hand sewer who has worked making shoes for Edward Green for over 30 years gave me and a small audience a fantastic demonstration. He was very honest about his work and the methods which he uses. I was able to see him begin the sewing of the two front parts of the shoe together. He carefully inserts a sharp tool into half of the leather, which is the best calf’s leather which has been cut by hand. He then threads Chinese boar hair into that hole to attach the two pieces. He says that they use boar’s hair as over time cotton would rot and these shoes are made to last a lifetime!

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: Example of the “stirrup” and Andy wearing the shoes pictured above which he is also making

The stirrup is used traditionally to keep everything attached to the knee where most of the work is happening, effectively working like an elastic band, keeping both hands free to focus on the stitching. He works on this piece for 15-20 minutes and tells me that this one small area of the shoe can take up to 2 hours to be completed, which it then it goes on to other departments to be finished and finalised by the staff at the factory in Northampton. The handwork that must go into one pair of shoes was exquisite to see.

Emblem by Rose At St James Pavilion

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Image: The screen printing equipment Rose works with

Emblem by Rose is a beautiful independent, up and coming screen printing company. Everything Emblem states to do, is done by Rose entirely on her own, and speaking with her on Thursday made that evident to me. Visitors were even able to commission their own ties if they should wish to. This alone made me feel like Rose is very passionate about what she does and communicates what Emblem as a small independent company is all about.

Hawthorne and Heaney explore London Craft Week - 3rd - 7th May 2017 London Hand Embroidery

Above Images: Rose Demonstrating the printing process with screen and also squeegee

Sadly I didn’t get to this exhibit in time to see any demonstrations, but Rose was wonderful to speak with. She really engaged with her audience and spoke honestly about her work and why she is so passionate about making bespoke designs for her clients. She spoke of how she is always trying out new techniques with mixed media and programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator to make her work more efficient and durable for the client. All imagery is designed and drawn by Rose, before being transferred into a screen to be printed onto silk scarves. Despite not having any demonstration, Rose was very good at explaining the printing process to me, she was a delight to speak with.

London Craft Week will be finishes on Sunday 7th May so see what you can before it is all over this year, click here to go to the website for full listings. We can not wait to see what next year will bring!

Written by Phillipa Lloyd & Amelia Beaumont-Dodd 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for London Craft Week Part 2

Along side our Monogramming for Handkerchiefs class on the 4th May, we are also holding a Monogramming for Cufflinks class on the 5th May. You can join us to learn the delicate art of monogramming and leave with your own monogrammed cufflinks at the end. Follow the link to secure your place as spaces are strictly limited, tickets are £60 plus VAT and can only be bought directly from the London Craft Week Website.

Hawthorne & Heaney for London Craft Week Part 2 London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery

Central Saint Martins graduate and one of London’s newest emerging designers, Molly Goddard, is holding a new, interactive exhibition at Greenwich’s NOW Gallery where you are invited to sit and embroider one of her floor to ceiling tulle dresses for free. When an opportunity like this comes up we just had to go and check it out for ourselves!

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

In one large, sunlit room, the six colourful oversized dresses hang from the ceiling on pulleys so that the whole length of the dress can eventually be covered. You are encouraged to sit on one of the chairs around the dresses and embroider absolutely anything you like on them.

For Molly, the exhibition is about people ‘enjoying doing something with their hands’ and she hopes that people from all walks of life will come and make their mark on one of her dresses.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

Around the room are simple and clear instructions for basic embroidery stitches, meaning anyone from an absolute beginner to an embroidery artist can come and express their creativity on the dresses. This is such a lovely way for everyone to experience embroidery and is a fun way to introduce people to the traditional craft. The whole exhibition is also very child friendly with blunt, plastic needles and scissors attached to a chain in the centre, making it an excellent activity for the whole family to take part in.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

Collecting a oversized needle and some thread from the central podium, I chose a blank space and began to stitch directly onto the tulle. The whole experience was very relaxing and there was no pressure on what you did with the thread so you could just experiment and let your imagination run wild!

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

Each little stitch helps the dresses to grow and evolve and it was very exciting to be able to add my own personal mark amongst all the others in what feels like a huge community project.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

The exhibition only opened and already the bottom of the dresses are filling up with an array of interesting designs and colour from a variety of different people. I can’t wait to see what they will look in February when the exhibition closes and one of the dresses will be auctioned off for charity.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Molly Goddard’s ‘What I Like’ Exhibition at the NOW Gallery London Hand Embroidery

 

Don’t miss out on your chance to be a part of this very unique interactive art installation!

The exhibition runs from 4 November 2016 to 19 February 2017

Monday to Friday 10am – 7pm

Saturday and Sunday 11am – 4pm

Closed for Christmas 24 December – 2nd January

 

NOW Gallery

The Gateway Pavilions

Peninsula Square

London

SE10 0SQ

By Jessica Eykel

Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home!

For those that don’t know Hawthorne & Heaney have moved into a fabulous new studio located in 14 Rathbone Place, Fitzrovia. A short walk from Tottenham Court Road station the new studio is spacious, airy and bright with 3 studio spaces.

Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home! London Hand Embroidery

The studio now has multifunctioning rooms and our sister company London Embroidery School is using one of those rooms to host embroidery classes to learn techniques such as Goldwork and Tambour. Check out the website here to see what they have to offer:

http://www.londonembroideryschool.com

Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home! London Hand Embroidery

With such ample space we are able to be uber creative and this week our embroiderer Natasha has been working on creating goldwork inspired embroidery with a variation of metallic threads.

Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home! London Hand Embroidery Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home! London Hand Embroidery

Throughout history Fitzrovia has been home to many inspiration creatives such as the English writer Virginia Woolf and Nobel Prize Winner George Bernard Shaw, whose famous playwright ‘Pygmalion’ was later adapted into an American musical called ‘My Fair Lady’ 1964.

Hawthorne & Heaney have a new home! London Hand Embroidery

Fitzrovia is also famous for the local ‘Fitzroy Tavern’ located in Charlotte Street. In the 1920’s it became the hub for artists, tradesmen and intellectuals.

The latest big project in Fitzrovia has been the Great Portland Estates redevelopment of the former Royal Mail site between Rathbone Place and Newman Street. The site comprises 2.3 acres of land which will be created into a new public square with high quality offices, retail spaces and 162 residential apartments. Facebooks new UK headquarters will be located here.

It seems that we are in the perfect location for our craft!

References:
Great Portland Estates: http://www.gpe.co.uk/property/our-portfolio/north-of-oxford-street/rathbone-square.aspx

Hidden London: http://hidden-london.com/gazetteer/fitzrovia/

Fitzrovia Trust: http://www.fitzroviatrust.org/joomla16/index.php/ct-menu-item-3

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition

London seems to be alive with fashion exhibitions and installations at the moment so Hawthorne & Heaney have been making the most of the location privilages and have been enjoying the culture on offer. One such opportunity is at the Louis Vuitton’s Series 3 exhibition on the Strand.

The exhibition is staged as a walk through Nicolas Ghesquiere’s mind coming in underneath a hugely imposing hanging ball grid structure in a highly mirrored room, a theme that runs throughout.

The exhibition is a great example of how technology and fashion can come together as art, which is effectively used in the laser room. Green lasers from the ceiling cut down around what seem to be meaningless shapes below but as time goes on, and all the pieces are cut out, they come together seamlessly to form a shoe or a handbag. This then slowly transforms into the CAD mock up of the finished piece with all its fastenings and details.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

You then move on to see a more real world explanation of the making of the Petite Malle bags in the Artists hands room where close up videos are shown of how the bags are put togther. This is then renforced by as you are also able to interact the the makers in person in the Craftsmanship room.Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand EmbroideryHawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Seeing the makers constructing in person really helps to give a sense of the difficulty and intricacy of these bags which are made like trunks, but on a much tinier scale. This combination of rooms flows easily through the design process, from idea to drawing and development, to the construction and realisation. Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

There is a little look back at the history of the trunks, from some of the earliest made pieces to others that show their development in size, shape and material in a dazzlingly white room.Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Finally there is the rare opportunity to see upclose some of the garments that you have been watching walk towards you throughout the exhibiton, but more so to feel them as they are hung in a giant perpex wardrobe installation. This demonstrated the variety of fabrics and qualities that have been used in the collection including whitework lace, jaquard, leather, fur and diamantes.Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand Embroidery  Hawthorne & Heaney Visits The Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition London Hand EmbroideryAs an embroiderer this last room and the craftsmanship rooms were probably the most interesting of the exhibition as they give a good understanding of the craft and techniques used in their creation. One does leave the exhibition feeling a little disorientated by all the mirrors and lights which drew the attention away from the skills themselves. However from the general public’s point of view this provides an interesting fusion of technology and art whilst perhaps giving a little glimpse at the chaos of Ghesquiere’s mind.

If you would like to see the exhibition and decide for yourself, it is on until the 18th October at 180 The Strand, entry is free so make the most of it!