Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Spanning across 8 rooms the V&A museum’s exhibition, Ocean Liners: Speed and Style, takes us back to an era of opulence and lifestyle travel. Walls painted in moody grey tones, wooden floors, all paired with ocean sounds create an atmosphere of warmth and comfort.

 

Starting off with a brief history of ocean liners and their links to immigration they quickly move forward to when immigration quotas were introduced,and the start of the liners we came to know today. Bold display of large posters and magazines advertising trips and destinations adorned the walls, these originally were to entice the people with money, advertising this lifestyle of travel and luxury that previously they had turned their noses up at. All of the posters touched on a feeling of brightness and a new modern age.

 

As you walk around the first room there are models of ships and detailed drawings of the impressive building these companies invested in to further enhance this idyllic way of travel.

Moving on through, the exhibition touches more upon the furniture and interior design of these magnificent ships many of which were inspired by the arts and craft movement and often a showcase of the country’s goods, such as the British Queen Mary was a showcase of British woods. Wall panels and furniture, mainly chairs, continued through the exhibition as these are a good way of tracking style change within eras. There was a sense of nostalgia in each of the rooms, as videos of life on these ships are played throughout.

 

 

Further on through they discuss the importance of liners throughout World War 1 and 2 as troop transport and delivering supplies and the addition of new engineering advancements to the liners as aircraft travel superseded them. There is also a Wooden panel fragment from an over-door in the first-class lounge on Titanic.

Embroidery and craftsmanship were very apparent throughout, even more so when it came to the last section which focused more on the liners as they became a vacation/leisure activity. This is when deck chairs were being introduced, lounging by the pool became popular and games such a deck curling were installed on deck.

Amongst the collection of swimwear, and Louis Vuitton luggage cases are outfits and objects from Miss Emilie Grigsby, a well travelled American socialite, who’s wardrobe is not only stunning but ahead of the times in many aspects.

 

Overall the exhibition is nostalgic and beautiful with a large mix of tastes and periods, taking influence from various cultures. We would definitely say this is one not to miss as it is a masterclass in style.

The Ocean Liners: Speed and Style will be running at the V&A until Sunday 17th June. Prices are £18.00 for an adult and £15.00 for a student with concession tickets available.

Hawthorne & Heaney lends a helping hand

Its that time of year again, fashion and textile graduates will know what we mean.

Your design tutor who has finally signed off on your incredibly ambitious embroidery design for your final collection / portfolio.  They love it and have uttered the immortal words “but I want to see more”.

After a few brief moments of relief the creeping panic begins to set in.  A look over the calendar confirms it.  There is just not enough time for one person to achieve all this for deadline !

Don’t worry we are here to help !!  Hawthorne & Heaney specialise in fast turnaround and as a larger percentage of our work is made in London ordering, design changes and pick up/drop off are streamlines to cut days of standard lead times.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney have helped many students over the years at graduate level including Claire Barrow and Ashley Williams !

Give us a call 020 7637 5736 or drop us an email info@embroidery.london

Hawthorne & Heaney goes BIG!

You have heard Hawthorne & Heaney talk a lot about the work we do for interiors projects around the globe.  The challenges of scale, regulations and time lines that come along side these projects don’t make them the easiest, but do make them very exciting and regularly push the boundaries of what we can achieve at Hawthorne & Heaney.

 

For the past couple of months our studio has been working closely with our manufacturing team on an idea which changes the way we, as embroiderers, work with large format embroideries.  

After significant investment in production and logistics Hawthorne & Heaney is very excited to launch our service offering 

LARGE SCALE EMBROIDERY PRODUCTION

 

The service is perfect for those looking for a couple of meters for bespoke apparel, up to hundreds of meters to complete large scale interior design projects.

 

Our design and production teams can advise on base fabrics and can help work within a budget if specified.

We can assist with design and produce a range of samples for your clients for approval in advance of placing an order and we are of course happy to sample without a commitment to a quantity order.

 

Embroidery is the perfect way to make your project stand out and Hawthorne & Heaney can help achieve the subtlest of highlights to the boldest of ideas across nearly all interiors fabrics.

Prices start at £35 per meter.  If you would like to make an enquiry give us a call 0044 (0) 20 7637 5736 or pop us an email info@embroidery.london.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney does Victoria Secret

Last weekend, we had another monogramming event with lingerie brand Victoria Secret. It was held at their brand new store on bond street.  

To celebrate their opening, customers were able to have their Victoria Secret robe personalised with their initials. They were able to choose from two fonts, and a range of colours. We were glad to be able to celebrate with them.

Below, are some pictures of the event:

 

If you were lucky enough to get your hands on one of these robes, we would love to see a photo! Tag us on Instagram @hawthorneheaney

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue!

There is nothing worse when a beloved item of clothing becomes damaged! whether it be a tear or a pesky moth has taken a bite.

While this may feel like the end of an item. Fear not, with a bit of embroidery we can bring your garment back to life!

With some tricks up our sleeves and a creative eye. We brought new life to this cashmere coat with some Goldwork bees!

Even though there were only a few holes we added more bees to make them a feature of the coat. 

We have also come to the aid of split seams! this beautiful tartan jacket came to us. One of our very talented embroiderer, designed this stunning humming bird with blues and yellows.

One Bird just want enough!

Let us know your thoughts! 

Hawthorne & Heaney does Couture

Hawthorne & Heaney get a lot of exciting projects, but there was one project recently that created a buzz of excitement in the studio.


We were asked to create a hand embroidered dress, onto a lovely red tulle. with a little bit of sparkle thrown in.

Take a look at our progress throughout this exciting project

The dress travelled from Vienna to London and back to Vienna, a special dress for a special occasion.

 

 

Hawthorne & Heaney needs you !

OPEN CALL and VIP ACCESS

As artisans we are drawn to beautiful things.  

The art we work on is a reflection of our taste and dedication.

 

 

We asked ourselves why shouldn’t the the luxury we surround ourselves with daily be reflected in the tools of our trade.

As embroiderers, frustrated with hunting through the ever dwlinding treasure trove of vintage and second hand, we decided to create some tools that would be a pleasure to use, collect and admire.

After all the journey is as important as the destination !

 

 

The Heaney’s Haberdashery team want you to tell us about the tools you use.  Let us know your favourites and the reasons behind why.  

We are developing some long lost gems and we need your feedback on what tools you would like to see and why.

Sign up to the Newsletter to find out how you can get involved, VIP access to limited edition runs, Early Bird discount codes and updates on our progress.

Follow us on Instagram for a sneak peak on how things are going daily !

Hawthorne & Heaney go to the Ball

The jewel of any Savile Row’s social calendar is the Bespoke Tailors Benevolent Association dinner, at the Merchant Taylors Hall in central London. This year it fell on the evening of the 9th of February, and as always one has to dress to impress. Tailors, cloth merchants, mills and embroiderers all gathered to raise money for the BTBA charity, who support anyone who has fallen on hard times after working in the British tailoring industry for over 10 years .

From bespoke dinner suits and custom dresses to evening gowns and velvet suit jackets everyone made an impression. There are speeches, mingling of old (and new) friends,  ‘’here-here’s’’ every now and then when someone says something commendable, lovely food and a brilliant atmosphere all whilst raising thousands of pounds for charity. Four of us from the Hawthorne & Heaney team were there to represent the embroidery industry.

Check out some of the photos from the night below:

 

Hawthorne & Heaney team

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BfG64nLnBzA/?hl=en&tagged=btba

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Monogramming Event for Mission Media

Last week Hawthorne & Heaney could be found at the Victoria’s Secret velentines day lauch, organised by Mission Media. The event was held at the gorgeous Elan Cafe in Knightsbridge which was just the perfect setting for us a glamous and romantic event.

Guests were able to have their Victoria’s Secret robe personalised with their initials as a little memento of the evening…

Images courtsey of @elan_cafe, @alexmiller_elan, and @thisismission

Hawthorne & Heaney visits Scythians: Warriors of ancient Siberia

We like to keep our interests broad here at Hawthorne & Heaney so The British Museum’s current exhibition, Scythians: Warriors of ancient Siberia, looked appealing to us. On from the 14th September 2017 to the 14th January 2018 it looks at the nomadic tribes who flourished between 800 and 200 BC, displaying various examples of their gold jewellery, clothing, weapons and living equipment.

The exhibition is spread across 4 large rooms, with carefully illustrated videos and child friendly sections of signage. Whilst walking round there is a subtle soundtrack of wind blowing playing in all the room to really add effect the the visuals you see.

 

It starts off with a little introduction about the Scythians, which was a collective name for different tribes that spoke Iranian, and shared a similar lifestyle and dress. Little has been previously known about these people who controlled a vast region of northern China all the way to the Black sea, as they had no written language, but since burial sites have been found and the permafrost preserved most objects scientist and historians have started to piece together a look into their life.

They were sophisticated crafts people and fearsome warriors who lived in tents and herded sheep, tradition was a focal point around whatever they did, as they used to bury the dead with all they needed for the afterlife. They had a strong bond with their own horses and often they were buried along with the owners as they believed the bond carried through to the afterlife.

Scythians with horses under a tree. Gold belt plaque. Siberia, 4th–3rd century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin.

 

The jewellry on display was stunning gold that was usually either hammered and polished by hand or cast using a technique using cloth and clay. Gold was associated with the sun and power and most of the scenes buckles and decorative horse saddles depicted were scenes of mythical animals killing ordinary animals, this was believed to symbolise concern over preservation of world order. The items are remarkably well preserved and some still contain their original turquoise or blue glass inlays.

 

Deer-shaped gold plaque. Barrow 1, Kostromskaya, Kuban region. Second half of the 7th century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin.

 

Gold plaque with hare hunt. Kul’ Oba, northern Black Sea region, first half of the 4th century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin.

 

Opposite these there is a bit of information about Tsar Peter the first, who sent exhibitions to southern Siberia and found the burial sites. After this he ordered anything gold found around there was to be sent to him,where he documented and recorded and stored all the items. Some of the watercolours used to document the items are also on display.

Woman’s shoe. Leather, textile, tin, pyrite crystals, gold foil, glass beads. Burial mound 2, Pazyryk, Altai mountains, southern Siberia, late 4th–early 3rd century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin

 

What I found most interesting was the clothing and textiles that were displayed. One of the burial sites that was found contained what they believed to be a Chief and his wife. The clothing was elaborately decorated with punched, gold crouching panther pieces and a lot of the fur that they wore, a variety of squirrel, leopard, and other animals, was dyed using traditional natural dyes such as indigo and cochineal. Other items of particular interest were the highly decorated shoes, head gear and the fake beards the men were buried with.

False beard. Mound 2, Pazyryk, Altai mountains, southern Siberia, late 4th–early 3rd century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin.
Man’s headgear and illustration showing how it may have been worn. Burial mound 2, Pazyryk, Altai mountains, southern Siberia. Late 4th–early 3rd century BC. © The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin. Reconstruction drawing by E V Stepanova.

The beards were of particular speculation because scans and the preservation of the mummified bodies showed that they were often clean shaven and both men and women were heavily tattooed. Applique onto woolen items were heavily featured as well although these didn’t survived as well as others.

What tribes they couldn’t make and produce themselves they traded and stole from other tribes. The most highly prized item was Chinese patterned silk, some of these fragments have survived. The exhibition also touches on the weapons and armour that was used, the bond with their horses and the influences from other cultures such as the Greeks, and Persians. Eventually they were superseded by other nationalities and tribes as new traditions got introduced the old ones vanished and formed what we know as the mongol tribes and others.

 

Over all the exhibition is really informative and covers a wide variety of interests and is running till the 14th January 2018 at The British Museum.

All photos are from The British Museum Blog.