Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up – Exhibition Visit

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo in blue satin blouse, 1939, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

The exhibition Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is currently at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and we recently took the chance to visit. This unique show gives a detailed overview of Kahlo’s life: her family and heritage; her politics; her relationship with mural painter Diego Rivera; the near-fatal accident that caused her a lifetime of pain; and most importantly, how she constructed her image and the way in which she lived her life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Kahlo’s home in Mexico, La Casa Azul (The Blue House).

Upon Kahlo’s death in 1954, her husband Rivera locked up her most valuable possessions in the bathroom of the Casa Azul (The Blue House, their home in Mexico) and instructed that it not be opened until 15 years after her death. In 2004 this bathroom was opened, and the contents of the room went on display at the Casa Azul as a museum dedicated to her life. These objects are what now fill the exhibition space at the V&A, carefully shipped thousands of miles to be shown outside of Mexico for the first time.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo and Family, 1926, photograph by Guillermo Kahlo.
Kahlo challenges gender stereotypes by wearing a suit.

The exhibition begins with old photographs of Kahlo and her family, some of which are adorned with Kahlo’s handwritten notes. Some simply label family members, whereas others are more personal: for example, on the back of Kahlo’s Communion photo she has scrawled “¡IDIOTA!” as she renounced Catholicism later in life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Pre-columbian jade beads, possibly assembled by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

The show continues through a series of rooms to Kahlo’s accessories: heavy jade necklaces; crescent earrings featuring paired birds, which are traditional of Mexican jewellery; and hand-woven ‘Rebozo’ shawls and ‘Morrale’ sack bags. These items highlight Kahlo’s pride in her Mexican heritage.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Revlon nail varnishes, compact and lipstick in Kahlo’s favourite shade, ‘Everything’s Rosy’.

We then move on to Kahlo’s possessions, perhaps one of the most personal parts of the exhibition. Intimate items are on display such as used lipsticks and empty medicine bottles accompanied by letters to and from her various doctors.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Plaster corset, painted and decorated by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

Kahlo’s suffering due to childhood polio and a car accident at the age of 18 lies at the foundation of some of these objects. For most of her life she wore uncomfortable corsets to help support her back and alleviate pain, some of which were made of plaster and decorated with painting as Kahlo used them like a canvas.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Left: Cotton Huipil with chain stitch embroidery, cotton skirt with printed floral motifs.
Right: Guatemalan cotton coat worn with Mazatec Huipil and plain floor-length skirt.

Finally, the main feature of the exhibition is a stunning display case of Kahlo’s clothing. Kahlo is renowned for her combinations of indigenous garments from different regions of Mexico, and she was photographed in such outfits many times. To see them up close in real life is breathtaking.

Detailed embroidery is present in most of the outfits, from complexly shaded flowers and birds to cross stitch to traditional Chinese embroidery (due to Kahlo’s fascination with Chinatown when she moved to the USA with Rivera). The exhibition gives details of her most striking outfits, describing how she was followed by children when in the USA, who asked “Where is the circus?”.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Self Portrait with Monkeys, 1943. Oil on Canvas, 81.5 x 63cm.

There are some of Kahlo’s paintings – mainly self portraits as she used herself as a subject when painting from her bed – but the exhibition mainly focuses on Kahlo’s items and how she presented the complex layers of her identity within her life. It states that her wardrobe was not staged: she dressed up even when she wasn’t expecting visitors, and even when she was in bed rest.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo on the Bench, 1939. © Nickolas Murray Photo Archives.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is a bewitching and intimate exhibition. The items on display are fascinating, and through them the personal details of how Kahlo naturally lived an artistic life – despite her misfortunes and pain – are revealed. A must-see for anyone interested in textiles, and anyone interested in Frida Kahlo’s complex and inspiring life.

Purchase tickets at the V&A website here.

Written by Laura Hill

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney has been very fortunate to have a series of wonderful students who come to the studio as interns to learn about the industry and experience a working studio. But what do they actually do while they are with us I hear you ask?

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

 

What they work on day to day is very changeable but for our longer term interns we like them to have a project of their own ongoing whilst they are with us. The gorgeous images you see here are from our most recent intern, Elsie Wong who was working on some floral motifs for us along side her other duties.

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

She draws on her Singaporean heritage and Central Saint Martins experience to bring her clean yet delicate style to these pieces. 

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

She then went on to translate one of the pieces into embroidery using one of the techniques learnt in her classes at the London Embroidery School, specifically Limerick Lace. 

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand Embroidery

Here is is presenting her final piece to us demonstrating the design process from design, to draft, to embroidery.  I’m sure you will agree, great job Elsie! What do you think?

Hawthorne & Heaney: Intern Projects London Hand EmbroideryIf this has taken your fancy and you would like to join us as an intern, please see the internships blog or jobs section of the website for application as we are currently looking for someone to join us for an immediate start.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs

Embroidery repairs is a topic we keep coming back to but we thought we would share another project with you where embroidery was used to breath new life into a damaged garment.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand EmbroideryIt is so pleasing when we are able to use a method that is usually about decoration only but also allow an item that would have otherwise have lost its use, to be beautiful and useful again.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand Embroidery

Damaged area before embroidery

This jacket was made of a very rough grain tweed which through rubbing and wear had got damaged and started to ray over a large area of about 15 cm. The embroidery that was designed for the area was inspired by the Japanese practise of Kintsukuroi (golden repair) where broken pottery is fixed using gold laquer.  It ties in with the philosophy of wabi-sabi, embracing of the flawed or imperfect which felt appropriate for this project given that we knew that the damage would still be to come extent visible but making the repair in an asthetically pleasing way makes the object becomes more beautiful for having been broken and fixed.

Hawthorne & Heaney on Embroidery Repairs London Hand Embroidery

We used 4 shades of blue to reflect the different thread colours in the weave which are all in satin stitch to help to hold the damaged area together. Then there is a layer of gold metallic thread added over raisings to give it that laquered effect that is so significant to this technique and ties in with the metal details of the jacket. After the embroidery there were still a few threads to pulled through to tidy as can be seen and to reattach the hem, but we were very please with the end result.

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton’s Retrospective

FASHION IN MOTION

Holly Fulton

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryFashion in Motion: Holly Fulton | Image: Chris Taylor

On 20th July, we attended Fashion in Motion featuring Holly Fulton at the Victoria and Albert Museum. It was a spectacular retrospective of the label, that featured highlights from past seasons. We sat eagerly and were anxious to get a snapshot of how the label has evolved over the years. As the shows began, we were not disappointed, Fulton sent down models decked out in beautiful and complex graphic embellishments, laid out in eye catching bold colours..

She restyled the looks, so as to create a more congruent show. In spite of the varied colour palettes and array of inspiration that stretches across 6 seasons, she succeeded in highlighting her unique visual aesthetic that couples with her hand rendered backdrop. Below are some of the looks:

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

The collection that we liked the most was Spring Summer 2016, seen in the two looks below. She drew inspiration from Eileen Agar, who collage decorative elements with nature. Fulton skillfully translated the spiral seashell shapes and kaleidoscope colour palette into her prints and embellishment. And she even included a cascading tail into the mix, that were balanced out with well orchestrated and balanced proportions.

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryEileen Agar | The return of the Blues

Hawthorne & Heaney at Holly Fulton's Retrospective London Hand EmbroideryHolly Fulton | Image: Yanyun

After this opportunity to feast on Holly’s designs, we are excited to see what the designer would sent down the runway in the coming fashion week.

 

By Elsie Wong

 

Hawthorne & Heaney at The BTBA Summer Party 18

Hawthorne & Heaney at The BTBA Summer Party 18 London Hand Embroidery

A warm mid summer evening has become the mark of the BTBA Summer Party and this year’s do was no exception. The very best dressed of London’s tailoring community congregated on Friday evening in the gorgeous Merchant Taylors’ Hall to mark the occasion.

Hawthorne & Heaney at The BTBA Summer Party 18 London Hand Embroidery

The party includes the presentation to those who have earned their Savile Row Bespoke Cutting diploma such as Kathryn Sargent’s Alistair Nimmo, whom we must congratulate along with the others who earned their certificates.

Hawthorne & Heaney at The BTBA Summer Party 18 London Hand Embroidery The Hawthorne & Heaney team were there to enjoy the celebrations and spread the love for embroidery. It was great to see everyone, but if you missed us, pop by to the studio and say hello!

 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges

During last weekend, Hawthorne & Heaney set up camp in London’s Selfridges store for a monogramming event for Australian Hat brand ‘Lack of Color’.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

‘Lack Of Color is the popular Australian label that produces a range of men’s and women’s hats available in seasonal colours and styles. Created by Tess Corvaia and Robert Tilbury, a creative couple from Queensland, Australia who aim to bring their loyal customers a range of innovative and wearable pieces each season.’ (Lack of colour About page)

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

Thanks to the lovely hot weather we have being having here, we were offering these hand embroidered monograms onto the hat ribbons or bands, usually of their strawhats as shown.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

With a choice of 16 colour for the embroidery, the combinations on offer are numerous.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

It’s always great fun working with such different and interesting brands in some of the best known shops in the world!

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

If you missed out on the opportunity to have your hat personalised in store and would like to get it done, this is something that we can do for you in the studio, get in contact with us by phone or email and we can advise you futher.

Or if you would like to put on your own hand embroidery event with us… get in touch!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition

A few weeks ago, we seized the opportunity to visit the new photography exhibition at Opera Gallery. Featuring german photographer Ellen Von Unwerth, titled ‘Ladyland’, whose fashion work have been published in American, Italian, and British Vogue, Interview and Vanity Fair . Stepping into the gallery, we were greeted by a series of playful yet sensual photographs, which are Unwerth’s celebrated style. Although provocative in nature, there is an atmosphere of silliness and spontaneity, we often do not see in fashion and beauty photoshoots.

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Upon unearthing more about Unwerth, we discovered that much of her photo taking style is attributed to her experience as a model. She explains “I know how vulnerable and naked people can feel in front of the camera, so I’m very positive.” She gives girls roles to play, for example, because she found the lack of freedom to express herself as a model frustrating. “I like to go big and wild! I want the models to be silly in front of the camera, I want them to live their life!” Being frustrated with standing still in fashion shoots, Unwerth decided to be behind the lens instead, giving her subjects the freedom to be silly.

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand EmbroideryHawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney visits the Von Unwerth Exhibition London Hand Embroidery

In some of her photographs, the spontaneity shines through in absurd poses that happen often when the models think she has finished shooting. This contributes to the feeling of movement, and heightens the carefree spirit that runs through much of her work, that makes it so appealing.

 

Check out her work! It is definitely not unwerth it to see.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has a new Fashion exhibition now showing in their fashion and textiles area called ‘Fashion from Nature‘. The exhibition provides an overview of how nature is used in fashion as well as how nature is reflected by fashion, which gives it a broader range of items to show and issues to call into question.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Waistcoat, Maker Unknown 1780 – 1789,

Like most of the exhibitions held in this area, downstairs displays the historical items, talking about the production of fabrics such as linen and silk with videos showing the full process.  From an embroidery perspective, there are a few real treats for the traditional embroidery enthusiasts such as this silk-shaded waistcoat featuring these gorgeously expressive monkeys.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Fish Scales Headband, Maker unknown, Circa 1800

There are unsurprisingly a number of pieces which include animal harvested materials which are undoubtedly beautiful but the issues surrounding their use are well discussed in the displays. These are presented next to some alternatives to the use of feathers and bones which help to stop the exhibition from getting too heavy as you may be surprised at when people started to discuss the place of animal cruelty in fashion. Some pieces are just surprising in themselves such as this fish scale floral headband from the Bahamas.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Pineapple Fibre Lace Handkerchief, Maker unknown

Some pieces are hard to believe they are what their descriptions say they are, such as the lace sample above which is made of pineapple fibres, an exquisite demonstration of how delicate this material can be used.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Cellulose evening Coat, Alix (Madame Grès), 1936

Upstairs, the pieces are all much more contemporary, focusing more on how fashion imitates and draws inspiration from nature rather than taking from it directly. The piece above is by Madame Gres which uses a combination of silk, cellulose fibres and artificial pearls to create an effect to imitate mother of pearl shell linings.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

‘Cat Woman’ Dress, Jean Paul Gaultier, 1997

As the theme of this exhibition is quite broad, it is a great opportunity to see a hand-picked selection of great pieces from some legendary designers; Alexander McQueen, Stella McCartney, Vivienne Westwood are all there as well as this piece from Jean Paul Gaultier which demonstrates how well skins can be replicated in other materials like beads.

Hawthorne & Heaney Visits Fashioned from Nature London Hand Embroidery

‘Rootbound #2’ Dress, Diana Scherer, 2017

Finally, we are presented with some exhibits which explore some of the alternative materials and developments which may become viable alternatives for the future of fashion. There is a piece by Diana Scherer where she has been training grass root systems to grown into lace designs which is quite incredible. It is not a fully resolved material as yet but demonstrates potential opportunities in clothing.

This exhibition is quite heavily loaded with questions of the issues that fashion has caused in the past, destruction of animals such as osprey, turtles and whales or the poisonous effects of dying and military as examples; and the way we continue to deal with these issues in the future. Therefore it is one that you can expect yourself to have to think about as well as admire the pieces on display. Fashioned From Nature is on at the Victoria and Albert Museum until the 27th Jan 2019, tickets start from £12.00.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week

What were you doing last week? Specifically 9-13 May. Did you manage to catch London Craft Week? Well, it’s alright if you missed it, because we are here to share with you what we did and learned!

This festival that spans across London celebrates British and international creativity. Covering a vast range of disciplines, it brought together over 200 established and emerging makers, designers, brands and galleries from around the world.

We started our journey in the heart of English bespoke tailoring- Savile Row. The Row that is entrenched deep in history, famous worldwide, houses over 100 craftsman in more than a dozen bespoke tailoring business. It is a community that not only produces the esteemed English luxurious product but is active in training new craftsman. We had the chance to attend an hour-long masterclass pattern cutting at Henry Poole & Co.  In the brief hour, taught by one of the cutters about dinner jackets, he engaged us on the construction of the trouser pattern. First, measurement was taken off a gentleman in the room, then he moved onto crafting the pattern. Primarily using the Centre Front Centre Back cutting system, where scales and mathematics are used to give proportions so as to draft for the body of the customer.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Dinner Suit Trouser Pattern Cutting Process | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Henry Poole & Co Ltd Suits | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

After the hour, we gained a heightened respect for the craft of tailoring. Behind one jacket, it involves roughly 10 artisans, who engage in the making of the various sections of the garment. They perfect the moulding and shaping of the fabric so that it sits perfectly on the body. Bespoke tailoring suits are certainly a class of their own in both elegance and comfort.

Next, we ventured down to Sloane Square, to discover Maria Svarbova’s photography series that was the inspiration behind Delpozo Spring Summer 2018 ‘Musicalia’ collection. We were blown away by the beautiful photographs, that has this retro-futuristic. The artist describes the series as having a sense of ‘artificial detachment’, although set in a retro environment, ‘the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.’, the moment is frozen in time. In addition, the symmetrical composition enhances the ethereal quality.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Maria Svarbova

Looking at the collection alongside the photographs, there is much resemblance in the colour palette. Creative director, Josep Font skillfully translated the swimming pool blue that ripples throughout the photographs, into the choice of the fabric and embroidery. Complimenting them with pastel shades of yellow, pink, and definitely the shocking red, there is a sense of a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

In addition, the geometric lines and stillness of the pool, reminds us of the intimate atmosphere at the atelier; cool, architectural and beautiful, a style synonym with the brand.

Lastly, we headed to the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize at the Design Museum, that will be held till 17 June. This exhibition best summarises craft and artistic endeavours all over the world. Exhibiting a range of international works that stretch across practices, such as ceramics, papercraft, woodwork to jewellery. Entering the exhibition, visitors are provided with an audio guide, that gives a detailed explanations about the works, aiding further appreciation and understanding of the craft in view.

One theme that ran throughout all the works exhibited is that there are continued efforts made to revive traditional techniques alongside pushing the boundaries of the skill. An example is a winning piece by Jennifer Lee, who mixed metallic oxides into clay to create colour, a technique that she discovered. Complimenting this avant-garde colouring technique, with an ancient practice of pinching and coiling clay, it resulted in the creation of a beautiful speckled surface. The varying gradient of bands that encircle the piece, resembles time frozen between traditional and contemporary.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Jennifer Lee (Winning Prize) Pale, Shadowed Speckled Traces, Fading Elipse, Bronze Specks, Tilted Shelf, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Another work, that we truly appreciate is by Takuro Kuwata’s Tea Bowl. Unlike traditional potters, who often aims to hide any cracks in their work, Kuwata defies that norm. He enhances the impression of chaos, that is natural to the unpredictable nature of ceramics, by making it the feature point of his work. By combining porcelain with platinum and steel, he challenges the possibility of materials. The melted and crack surface of the work is complemented with the saturated green patina, that makes the work contemporary and elegant.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Takuro Kuwata, Tea Bowl, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Embroidery is also celebrated at this exhibition! Richard McVetis, who is captivated by the meditative nature of the process, draws with needle and thread. He embroidered sixty cubes over the duration of sixty hours, materialising time into something tactile and visual.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Perched on 60 beams, the 60 cubes remind me of the globe of islands, but in a square. It is a rather fun way of curating the world and plays on the idea that the world is not round but square.

London Craft Week is truly a celebration of hands that spans multiple disciplines. It makes us cherish and esteem the time and energy that goes into crafting beautiful objects. Unlike mass produced items that are often regarded as disposable, the work of the hand interweaves personal stories and beauty into everything made. In this age of mass consumption and disposal, we are glad that there is a renaissance in the appreciation of creativity and craft worldwide. We at Hawthorne & Heaney, are definitely standing behind that resurgence and hope to safeguard the shared heritage of craft.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Spanning across 8 rooms the V&A museum’s exhibition, Ocean Liners: Speed and Style, takes us back to an era of opulence and lifestyle travel. Walls painted in moody grey tones, wooden floors, all paired with ocean sounds create an atmosphere of warmth and comfort.

 

Starting off with a brief history of ocean liners and their links to immigration they quickly move forward to when immigration quotas were introduced,and the start of the liners we came to know today. Bold display of large posters and magazines advertising trips and destinations adorned the walls, these originally were to entice the people with money, advertising this lifestyle of travel and luxury that previously they had turned their noses up at. All of the posters touched on a feeling of brightness and a new modern age.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

As you walk around the first room there are models of ships and detailed drawings of the impressive building these companies invested in to further enhance this idyllic way of travel.

Moving on through, the exhibition touches more upon the furniture and interior design of these magnificent ships many of which were inspired by the arts and craft movement and often a showcase of the country’s goods, such as the British Queen Mary was a showcase of British woods. Wall panels and furniture, mainly chairs, continued through the exhibition as these are a good way of tracking style change within eras. There was a sense of nostalgia in each of the rooms, as videos of life on these ships are played throughout.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Further on through they discuss the importance of liners throughout World War 1 and 2 as troop transport and delivering supplies and the addition of new engineering advancements to the liners as aircraft travel superseded them. There is also a Wooden panel fragment from an over-door in the first-class lounge on Titanic.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Embroidery and craftsmanship were very apparent throughout, even more so when it came to the last section which focused more on the liners as they became a vacation/leisure activity. This is when deck chairs were being introduced, lounging by the pool became popular and games such a deck curling were installed on deck.

Amongst the collection of swimwear, and Louis Vuitton luggage cases are outfits and objects from Miss Emilie Grigsby, a well travelled American socialite, who’s wardrobe is not only stunning but ahead of the times in many aspects.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Overall the exhibition is nostalgic and beautiful with a large mix of tastes and periods, taking influence from various cultures. We would definitely say this is one not to miss as it is a masterclass in style.

The Ocean Liners: Speed and Style will be running at the V&A until Sunday 17th June. Prices are £18.00 for an adult and £15.00 for a student with concession tickets available.