Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders

Looking through our website, you would be right in thinking that a fair amount of our work revolves around one off gifts, unique pieces and protypes; however we are able to produce quantity orders, should that be what you and your brand requires.

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Hand Embroidered Monograms onto Hankerchiefs

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Raised Machine Embroidery onto Napkins

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand Embroidery

Freestanding Branded Patches

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand EmbroideryPersonalised Towels

Hawthorne & Heaney does Quantity Orders London Hand EmbroideryHot Water Bottle and Blanket Sets

 We can offer express turn arounds subject to availability also as our studio is conveniently located in Central London. Get in touch if you have a project in mind that we can help with.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

Last month, The Worshipful Company of Broderers held a fashion show, dedicated to the best of embroidery in British Fashion. Hawthorne & Heaney was invited to be involved and naturally, it was an opportunity that could not be missed.

 

The Worshipful Company of Broderers is a livery company, dedicated to the protection and promotion of the art of embroidery. Also known as ‘The Brotherhood of The Holy Ghost of the City of London’, it was originally formed in the middle ages, receiving a Grant of Arms in 1558 and its first Charter on 25th October 1561 from Queen Elizabeth I. Charitable works lie at the core of the company as it functions today, with the fashion show acting as a fundraising event for their charity; Fine Cell Work and the Broderers’ Charity Trust. Fine Cell Work teaches needle-work to prison inmates and sells their products.  Established in 1997, Fine Cell Work now operates in more than 15 prisons to empower and rehabilitate inmates in preparation for their sucessful return to society.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

On what was a very balmy September evening, the company gathered beautiful examples of british embroidery work from well known designers such as Bruce Oldfield, Clements Ribeiro, Jasper Conran and Beulah, one example of which can be seen above. The show was held in the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral, London with the ladieswear mostly demonstrated beadwork with an array of evening gowns on show (as seen above).

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand EmbroideryHawthorne & Heaney was invited to contribute to the show in the form of these goldwork waistcoats for the gentlemen to wear. These were later auctioned off to raise further funds for the cause. Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

The first features a circular dove motif on purple with silkworks for the center and a cutwork edge.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

The second piece was this striking pair of rampant lions on red.

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand EmbroideryThe lions are most embroidered over raisings with cutwork, a pearle purl edges and silver/red accents throughout.Hawthorne & Heaney for the Worshipful Company of Broderers London Hand Embroidery

For more information on any The Worshipful Company of Broderers or Fine Cell Work, follow the links in the text above.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms

Hawthorne and Heaney are very fortunate have a a great variety of work that comes through our door which means that you may have unknowing seen our work. 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms London Hand Embroidery

Earlier this year, we worked on a piece for the advertising campaign for ‘Kalms’. They wanted to create an embroidery of their slogan onto the duvet with the real life packet.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Kalms London Hand Embroidery

The colour of the stitching was very important that it would photograph true against the colours of the packaging so we spent some time testing a few threads before settling on this one as the strongest option. The texture of the stitching was also very important to them as they wanted it to have a very hand embroidered feel, but the stitching is done by machine. Therefore we chose a cotton thread which is also used for hand embroidering and paid special attention to the direction of the stitched to make them look like they flow naturally, like ink from a pen.

 

We were very please with the end result, and feel that we achieved what we were trying to achieve with this project.  Have you seen it about?

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall


Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

This summer, we were lucky enough to be approach by the artist and interior designer; Luke Edward Hall in preparation for the opening of his summer shop in Belgravia.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

Illustration by Luke Edward Hall

He wanted to have two chairs embroidered with one of his designs, so we took his illustration (above) and created it as an embroidery which he then had made into these two gorgeous pieces. 

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

Stitched out on the green canvas, I think you will agree the chairs reflect the illustration very well and fit in with his ‘Greco-Disco’ style. The fabric was then made up by HOWE at 36 Bourne Street to  result in the finished pieces. We just love it when a collaborative effort come out this strongly.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Luke Edward Hall London Hand Embroidery

 

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up – Exhibition Visit

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo in blue satin blouse, 1939, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

The exhibition Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is currently at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and we recently took the chance to visit. This unique show gives a detailed overview of Kahlo’s life: her family and heritage; her politics; her relationship with mural painter Diego Rivera; the near-fatal accident that caused her a lifetime of pain; and most importantly, how she constructed her image and the way in which she lived her life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Kahlo’s home in Mexico, La Casa Azul (The Blue House).

Upon Kahlo’s death in 1954, her husband Rivera locked up her most valuable possessions in the bathroom of the Casa Azul (The Blue House, their home in Mexico) and instructed that it not be opened until 15 years after her death. In 2004 this bathroom was opened, and the contents of the room went on display at the Casa Azul as a museum dedicated to her life. These objects are what now fill the exhibition space at the V&A, carefully shipped thousands of miles to be shown outside of Mexico for the first time.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo and Family, 1926, photograph by Guillermo Kahlo.
Kahlo challenges gender stereotypes by wearing a suit.

The exhibition begins with old photographs of Kahlo and her family, some of which are adorned with Kahlo’s handwritten notes. Some simply label family members, whereas others are more personal: for example, on the back of Kahlo’s Communion photo she has scrawled “¡IDIOTA!” as she renounced Catholicism later in life.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Pre-columbian jade beads, possibly assembled by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

The show continues through a series of rooms to Kahlo’s accessories: heavy jade necklaces; crescent earrings featuring paired birds, which are traditional of Mexican jewellery; and hand-woven ‘Rebozo’ shawls and ‘Morrale’ sack bags. These items highlight Kahlo’s pride in her Mexican heritage.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Revlon nail varnishes, compact and lipstick in Kahlo’s favourite shade, ‘Everything’s Rosy’.

We then move on to Kahlo’s possessions, perhaps one of the most personal parts of the exhibition. Intimate items are on display such as used lipsticks and empty medicine bottles accompanied by letters to and from her various doctors.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Plaster corset, painted and decorated by Frida Kahlo. Museo Frida Kahlo.

Kahlo’s suffering due to childhood polio and a car accident at the age of 18 lies at the foundation of some of these objects. For most of her life she wore uncomfortable corsets to help support her back and alleviate pain, some of which were made of plaster and decorated with painting as Kahlo used them like a canvas.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Left: Cotton Huipil with chain stitch embroidery, cotton skirt with printed floral motifs.
Right: Guatemalan cotton coat worn with Mazatec Huipil and plain floor-length skirt.

Finally, the main feature of the exhibition is a stunning display case of Kahlo’s clothing. Kahlo is renowned for her combinations of indigenous garments from different regions of Mexico, and she was photographed in such outfits many times. To see them up close in real life is breathtaking.

Detailed embroidery is present in most of the outfits, from complexly shaded flowers and birds to cross stitch to traditional Chinese embroidery (due to Kahlo’s fascination with Chinatown when she moved to the USA with Rivera). The exhibition gives details of her most striking outfits, describing how she was followed by children when in the USA, who asked “Where is the circus?”.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Self Portrait with Monkeys, 1943. Oil on Canvas, 81.5 x 63cm.

There are some of Kahlo’s paintings – mainly self portraits as she used herself as a subject when painting from her bed – but the exhibition mainly focuses on Kahlo’s items and how she presented the complex layers of her identity within her life. It states that her wardrobe was not staged: she dressed up even when she wasn’t expecting visitors, and even when she was in bed rest.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up - Exhibition Visit London Hand Embroidery

Frida Kahlo on the Bench, 1939. © Nickolas Murray Photo Archives.

Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up is a bewitching and intimate exhibition. The items on display are fascinating, and through them the personal details of how Kahlo naturally lived an artistic life – despite her misfortunes and pain – are revealed. A must-see for anyone interested in textiles, and anyone interested in Frida Kahlo’s complex and inspiring life.

Purchase tickets at the V&A website here.

Written by Laura Hill

Hawthorne & Heaney, Short Internship Available

Hawthorne & Heaney, Short Internship Available London Hand EmbroiderySample by Charlotte Pearson

Hawthorne & Heaney is currently looking for an embroidery intern to join us for a few weeks in August 2018. Usually we only take internships of 3 months or more but we have a short period when we are looking for a little extra help between the 20th August and 7th Sept.

 Duties will include machine and hand sewing, general administration, maintenance of the social media sites, research, assisting with embroidery preparation for both the staff and for the School and errands. Applicants must be hard working, versatile, enthusiastic, professional, responsible and able work well in a small team. Attention to detail is a must along with patience as nothing in embroidery is particularly quick.

Specific Needs

  • Sewing skills are essential, and a proficiency in both hand and machine sewing would be ideal.
  • Computer knowledge of both MAC and PC, ideally with an understanding of adobe programs and G drive
  • Trend aware
  • Looking to gain experience in a live studio in the embroidery sector
  • Must be a current undergraduate student of a fashion/textiles related course
  • Able to travel into London every day

This internship is unpaid and should be taken in addition to a current undergraduate course, we are therefore unable to accept non students for this position. Hours are full time, Monday- friday 9-5pm.

If you would be interested in furthering your studies please fill out the attached form.

Hawthorne & Heaney, Short Internship Available London Hand EmbroideryElsie Wong (Former Intern) with her sample work

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges

During last weekend, Hawthorne & Heaney set up camp in London’s Selfridges store for a monogramming event for Australian Hat brand ‘Lack of Color’.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

‘Lack Of Color is the popular Australian label that produces a range of men’s and women’s hats available in seasonal colours and styles. Created by Tess Corvaia and Robert Tilbury, a creative couple from Queensland, Australia who aim to bring their loyal customers a range of innovative and wearable pieces each season.’ (Lack of colour About page)

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

Thanks to the lovely hot weather we have being having here, we were offering these hand embroidered monograms onto the hat ribbons or bands, usually of their strawhats as shown.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

With a choice of 16 colour for the embroidery, the combinations on offer are numerous.

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

It’s always great fun working with such different and interesting brands in some of the best known shops in the world!

Hawthorne & Heaney for Lack of Colour at Selfridges London Hand Embroidery

If you missed out on the opportunity to have your hat personalised in store and would like to get it done, this is something that we can do for you in the studio, get in contact with us by phone or email and we can advise you futher.

Or if you would like to put on your own hand embroidery event with us… get in touch!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week

What were you doing last week? Specifically 9-13 May. Did you manage to catch London Craft Week? Well, it’s alright if you missed it, because we are here to share with you what we did and learned!

This festival that spans across London celebrates British and international creativity. Covering a vast range of disciplines, it brought together over 200 established and emerging makers, designers, brands and galleries from around the world.

We started our journey in the heart of English bespoke tailoring- Savile Row. The Row that is entrenched deep in history, famous worldwide, houses over 100 craftsman in more than a dozen bespoke tailoring business. It is a community that not only produces the esteemed English luxurious product but is active in training new craftsman. We had the chance to attend an hour-long masterclass pattern cutting at Henry Poole & Co.  In the brief hour, taught by one of the cutters about dinner jackets, he engaged us on the construction of the trouser pattern. First, measurement was taken off a gentleman in the room, then he moved onto crafting the pattern. Primarily using the Centre Front Centre Back cutting system, where scales and mathematics are used to give proportions so as to draft for the body of the customer.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Dinner Suit Trouser Pattern Cutting Process | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Henry Poole & Co Ltd Suits | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

After the hour, we gained a heightened respect for the craft of tailoring. Behind one jacket, it involves roughly 10 artisans, who engage in the making of the various sections of the garment. They perfect the moulding and shaping of the fabric so that it sits perfectly on the body. Bespoke tailoring suits are certainly a class of their own in both elegance and comfort.

Next, we ventured down to Sloane Square, to discover Maria Svarbova’s photography series that was the inspiration behind Delpozo Spring Summer 2018 ‘Musicalia’ collection. We were blown away by the beautiful photographs, that has this retro-futuristic. The artist describes the series as having a sense of ‘artificial detachment’, although set in a retro environment, ‘the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.’, the moment is frozen in time. In addition, the symmetrical composition enhances the ethereal quality.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Maria Svarbova

Looking at the collection alongside the photographs, there is much resemblance in the colour palette. Creative director, Josep Font skillfully translated the swimming pool blue that ripples throughout the photographs, into the choice of the fabric and embroidery. Complimenting them with pastel shades of yellow, pink, and definitely the shocking red, there is a sense of a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Delpozo embroidery contrasted with Maria Svarbova’s photographs

 

In addition, the geometric lines and stillness of the pool, reminds us of the intimate atmosphere at the atelier; cool, architectural and beautiful, a style synonym with the brand.

Lastly, we headed to the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize at the Design Museum, that will be held till 17 June. This exhibition best summarises craft and artistic endeavours all over the world. Exhibiting a range of international works that stretch across practices, such as ceramics, papercraft, woodwork to jewellery. Entering the exhibition, visitors are provided with an audio guide, that gives a detailed explanations about the works, aiding further appreciation and understanding of the craft in view.

One theme that ran throughout all the works exhibited is that there are continued efforts made to revive traditional techniques alongside pushing the boundaries of the skill. An example is a winning piece by Jennifer Lee, who mixed metallic oxides into clay to create colour, a technique that she discovered. Complimenting this avant-garde colouring technique, with an ancient practice of pinching and coiling clay, it resulted in the creation of a beautiful speckled surface. The varying gradient of bands that encircle the piece, resembles time frozen between traditional and contemporary.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Jennifer Lee (Winning Prize) Pale, Shadowed Speckled Traces, Fading Elipse, Bronze Specks, Tilted Shelf, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

Another work, that we truly appreciate is by Takuro Kuwata’s Tea Bowl. Unlike traditional potters, who often aims to hide any cracks in their work, Kuwata defies that norm. He enhances the impression of chaos, that is natural to the unpredictable nature of ceramics, by making it the feature point of his work. By combining porcelain with platinum and steel, he challenges the possibility of materials. The melted and crack surface of the work is complemented with the saturated green patina, that makes the work contemporary and elegant.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Takuro Kuwata, Tea Bowl, 2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Embroidery is also celebrated at this exhibition! Richard McVetis, who is captivated by the meditative nature of the process, draws with needle and thread. He embroidered sixty cubes over the duration of sixty hours, materialising time into something tactile and visual.

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to London Craft Week London Hand Embroidery

Richard McVetis , Variations of a Stitched Cube,2017 | Image: Hawthorne & Heaney

 

Perched on 60 beams, the 60 cubes remind me of the globe of islands, but in a square. It is a rather fun way of curating the world and plays on the idea that the world is not round but square.

London Craft Week is truly a celebration of hands that spans multiple disciplines. It makes us cherish and esteem the time and energy that goes into crafting beautiful objects. Unlike mass produced items that are often regarded as disposable, the work of the hand interweaves personal stories and beauty into everything made. In this age of mass consumption and disposal, we are glad that there is a renaissance in the appreciation of creativity and craft worldwide. We at Hawthorne & Heaney, are definitely standing behind that resurgence and hope to safeguard the shared heritage of craft.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Spanning across 8 rooms the V&A museum’s exhibition, Ocean Liners: Speed and Style, takes us back to an era of opulence and lifestyle travel. Walls painted in moody grey tones, wooden floors, all paired with ocean sounds create an atmosphere of warmth and comfort.

 

Starting off with a brief history of ocean liners and their links to immigration they quickly move forward to when immigration quotas were introduced,and the start of the liners we came to know today. Bold display of large posters and magazines advertising trips and destinations adorned the walls, these originally were to entice the people with money, advertising this lifestyle of travel and luxury that previously they had turned their noses up at. All of the posters touched on a feeling of brightness and a new modern age.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

As you walk around the first room there are models of ships and detailed drawings of the impressive building these companies invested in to further enhance this idyllic way of travel.

Moving on through, the exhibition touches more upon the furniture and interior design of these magnificent ships many of which were inspired by the arts and craft movement and often a showcase of the country’s goods, such as the British Queen Mary was a showcase of British woods. Wall panels and furniture, mainly chairs, continued through the exhibition as these are a good way of tracking style change within eras. There was a sense of nostalgia in each of the rooms, as videos of life on these ships are played throughout.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Further on through they discuss the importance of liners throughout World War 1 and 2 as troop transport and delivering supplies and the addition of new engineering advancements to the liners as aircraft travel superseded them. There is also a Wooden panel fragment from an over-door in the first-class lounge on Titanic.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Embroidery and craftsmanship were very apparent throughout, even more so when it came to the last section which focused more on the liners as they became a vacation/leisure activity. This is when deck chairs were being introduced, lounging by the pool became popular and games such a deck curling were installed on deck.

Amongst the collection of swimwear, and Louis Vuitton luggage cases are outfits and objects from Miss Emilie Grigsby, a well travelled American socialite, who’s wardrobe is not only stunning but ahead of the times in many aspects.

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

 

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney goes to Ocean Liners: Speed and Style London Hand Embroidery

Overall the exhibition is nostalgic and beautiful with a large mix of tastes and periods, taking influence from various cultures. We would definitely say this is one not to miss as it is a masterclass in style.

The Ocean Liners: Speed and Style will be running at the V&A until Sunday 17th June. Prices are £18.00 for an adult and £15.00 for a student with concession tickets available.

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue!

There is nothing worse when a beloved item of clothing becomes damaged! whether it be a tear or a pesky moth has taken a bite.

While this may feel like the end of an item. Fear not, with a bit of embroidery we can bring your garment back to life!

With some tricks up our sleeves and a creative eye. We brought new life to this cashmere coat with some Goldwork bees!

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

Even though there were only a few holes we added more bees to make them a feature of the coat. 

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

We have also come to the aid of split seams! this beautiful tartan jacket came to us. One of our very talented embroiderer, designed this stunning humming bird with blues and yellows.

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

One Bird just want enough!

Hawthorne & Heaney to the Rescue! London Hand Embroidery

Let us know your thoughts!